Holiday rental prices in Spanish ski resorts down 7%

Homes in Baqueira

Baqueira, in the Pyrenees.

The 2017 skiing season starts with some good news for winter sports lovers. This year it’s cheaper to rent an apartment many Spanish ski resorts.

Adapted translation of an article published by Idealista.

According to data from Rentalia, the idealista group’s holiday let platform, the average price for holiday lets near the main Spanish ski resorts is around €150 a night, 7.4% cheaper than last year.

“The main Spanish ski resorts open between the end of November and the first week of December,” says Almudena Ucha, managing director of Rentalia. “Many holidaymakers have been waiting for this moment for months and they’ll be looking for accommodation near their favourite resort. Holiday lets are ideal for families or groups of friends who want to enjoy winter sports without spending too much on accommodation.”

So, how much does it cost to stay in one? The first thing to bear in mind is that holiday lets near most ski resorts are cheaper on average than last year. But not all of them – those near Sierra Nevada and Candanchú are more expensive.

Sierra Nevada is the most expensive on the list with an average price of €195 a night, up 10.2% in the year. The next most expensive price is for accommodation near Baqueira Beret with an average price of €174 a night. And that includes a 23.3% drop on last year.

Grandvalira and Vallnor ski resorts in Andorra also cost above the average at €163 a night, 15.5% less than last year.

Slightly cheaper are holiday lets in Huesca ski resorts. In Formigal, it costs €139 a night (down 9.1% in the year). Those near Cerler cost €119 a night, 19.6% less than last year.

But the cheapest average price is definitely in holiday lets near Candanchú with an average price of €112 a night. However, they’re the only ones along with those in Sierra Nevada to go up in price (8.7%).

About SPI News Feed

SPI News Feed provides general news about the Spanish property market and related articles translated from the Spanish press. For more in depth news, analysis, and opinion, see Mark Stücklin's blog.

Leave a Reply