Stuck in Spain unable to sell up and go home?

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    • #54900
      Anonymous
      Participant

      I’d like to talk to anyone who is stuck in Spain because they cannot sell their property, which they need to do to move back home. Send me a PM if that sounds like you, or you know someone in this situation.

      Thanks

      Mark

    • #91490
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Hi Mark,
      Im sure that for all those stuck in spain there are others like me stuck in UK. Unable to sell in Uk to move to Spain.
      Perhaps you can match them all up?

    • #91491
      Anonymous
      Participant

      @vilprano wrote:

      Hi Mark,
      Im sure that for all those stuck in spain there are others like me stuck in UK. Unable to sell in Uk to move to Spain.
      Perhaps you can match them all up?

      There is a big difference between ones and the others.

      The ones stuck in UK are following a dream, which can be postponed with nothing to lose.

      The ones stuck in Spain have had their dream shattered. Many are in
      live-or-die survival situation.

      Who do you think should attract more attention?

    • #91496
      Anonymous
      Participant

      flosmichael

      very true. With a housing shortage in the UK, selling will always be easier in decent area’a, as long as you’re not greedy. The mess in Spain is pretty well opposite, with far more property than buyers, and a reputation on the costas that’s falling apart.

    • #91497
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Hi,
      I did not imply that those stuck in Spain were in any way equal or less important than those of us who wish to move to Spain in the future.
      I also suffered as a result of the greed and incompetance of the Spanish property scandal and from poor legal assistance.
      I am greatly distressed by the plight of those whos lives have been blighted by this scandal. My post was intended to help those in this position. Having lost over 100K on a property that now wont be built I am aware of the pitfalls but still intend to make the move.

    • #91504
      Anonymous
      Participant

      ………………

    • #91505
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Hello itsme

      Its ME here.
      About sums it up but think there are far more good people with money or assets trying to get out of this country than trying to get back in.
      This can be better opportunity given a little time to move back when the market sits down so the exchange rate situation(if thats whats trapping people) can be one mans poison the others wine.
      Those that come back may wish they had stayed where they were when they see the mess we are in since they left.
      You are so right that its no competition as there are severe problems almost in almost every country at the moment.
      Whatever the problems they are in the past/here and everyone has to deal with it on case by case basis to somehow plan the future.

      ME

    • #91506
      Anonymous
      Participant

      itsme

      It’s not a competition, flosmichael has already explained when he said

      ”The ones stuck in UK are following a dream, which can be postponed with nothing to lose.

      The ones stuck in Spain have had their dream shattered. Many are in
      live-or-die survival situation.”

      Obviously some grey areas in between, but for some it’s a choice, for others it’s a financial disaster.

    • #91507
      katy
      Blocked

      People leave Spain mainly because they can’t find work. Most did very well out of working in property sales and now it’s all gone sour. The benefit system in Spain is not as generous as the UK. many are unable to claim any benefits here. They cannot pay their mortgages or bills. Others have lost a partner and are lonely and want to return to be close to friends and family. Some don’t even have enough money to return to the UK unless they sell.

      To compare their situation with (probably) a small number of people wanting to sell their UK home to move to Spain for the lifestyle is wrong and selfish.

    • #91508
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Thats what we are all saying? I think ?
      There are live and die situations in most countries/people have lost fortunes in property/savings and investments.
      Think that the comment that dreams can be cancelled are correct for some but a nightmare for others here and in Spain
      Whichever Country you look at come to that.
      Or is it the situation that the world happens to be stuck in Spain.

      Katy
      Why is it selfish that some may wish to sell and move to any Country and for whatever reason they choose
      People cant get work here/cant pay mortgages and the benefit system seems to support those that are not entitled to it.

      ME

    • #91509
      katy
      Blocked

      @ME wrote:

      Katy
      Why is it selfish that some may wish to sell and move to any Country and for whatever reason they choose
      People cant get work here/cant pay mortgages and the benefit system seems to support those that are not entitled to it.

      ME

      That’s is not what I was implying. I was commenting on the comparison of situations

      Why would I post that I came to live here 🙄

    • #91512
      Anonymous
      Participant

      @itsme wrote:

      What different situations are there:

      Retired, living in UK, can’t sell but wish to move to Spain

      Retired, living in Spain, can’t sell but wish to move back to UK

      Of working age, living in UK, can’t sell but wish to start new life in Spain

      Of working age, living in Spain, without work and wish to return to UK

      Does it have to be a ‘competition’ of who we all feel sorry for most? Everyone is suffering in their own situation.

      But, is the wish to move to the UK one because the UK government is far more generous with benefits? I read recently about the number of Poles returning to the UK to ride out the recession since they can earn far more in benefits in the UK than in Poland.

      We would move back to Spain tomorrow if our apartment there sold, or we wait until our mortgage review and hope that the payments are affordable on a Spanish wage! We though, in our 30’s, have time to dig ourselves out of this financial mess but those in their 60’s have far fewer options?

      Well, you said about yourself: “Genuine English/Spanish couple looking to sell this fully legal property only due to the fact that we have the opportunity to live rent free in a family home in England.”

      So you did not have any problem coming to UK as you live rent free here. But many others are not so lucky.

    • #91513
      Anonymous
      Participant

      @ME wrote:

      Think that the comment that dreams can be cancelled are correct for some but a nightmare for others here and in Spain

      What’s the nightmare that somebody would need to postpone his move to “A place in the Sun” for 3-4 years? Prices will be lower by then.

    • #91517
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Katy
      Imply or not people move for many reasons.
      Perhaps the way you portray Spain perhaps its about time you moved back.

      Flosmicheal
      Yes prices may very well be cheaper in any Country so that’s irrelevant.
      Exchange rates, interest rates ,stock markets may or may not be cheaper.
      The topic here is PEOPLE TRAPPED In Spain.
      It was mentioned that its felt that perhaps it would be a better topic if it did show how many feel trapped in the U.K also.
      I think it may show a pent up demand building for people that have stood by this government and the way its going and are trapped for the very reasons some feel trapped where they are. THAT GOES FOR ANYWHERE.
      As I said .Some have to accept it stay move or whatever. DEAL WITH IT AND STOP MOANING.
      That way the media would then start printing a fuller picture of this situation and in fact many other issues as well.
      Over hype in the media may or may not have made things far worse than they are and one day when they realise that when they report its getting better many will have made a fortune being ahead of the game.
      Anyway like most of us we are looking for solutions to problems, not making them worse.
      It’s a blip in history that’s all and no one will care a damn about those that have lost in a year or so.
      Now if it makes some happy by making reports on people being trapped in Spain France ,outer Mongolia then carry on.
      Me ? My interest in Spain and if one of those poor stranded souls wish to swap then I would be happy to join the majority who wouldn’t move back even if they paid them including most part of my family.
      Now. DEAL OR NO DEAL. KATY ?

      ME.

    • #91518
      Anonymous
      Participant

      ME wrote

      ”I would be happy to join the majority who wouldn’t move back even if they paid them including most part of my family. ”

      …. that’s a relief for us in the UK anyway.

    • #91519
      Anonymous
      Participant

      To the best of my knowledge the so called very generous UK benefits only apply to the down & outs. Any body who had been sensible & had saved etc or have other assets are not entitle to it.

      So if one has a property, they expect you to chisel out brick by brick to pay for your utilities, groceries etc.

      In EU if one has paid into the system it my understanding that one gets 75% to 80% of the final salary for two years.

    • #91522
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Shakeel
      One of my points confirmed.
      The ones that have worked hard ,saved or paid in are the ones moving out. The others into the U.K you mentioned are growing by the day.
      From the unprovoked comment by the(get a life) U.K poster before its no wonder many of us want to get away.
      Reading the forums it wasn’t hard to see that as a new poster I would be subject to abuse like the others just recent that have been insulted because they are Spanish/Spaniards etc ?and moved on.
      Is this the game zone he was on about ?
      Reading between the lines if you ignore them then they appear to carry on to the next target.
      However there does appear to be some good posters so hopefully I may fit in somewhere.
      Anyway. Does anyone know of any persons trapped in that dreadful country Falling house prices/Estate agents and hose sales at a record low /rising unemployment/no future/kids cant get a mortgage/workers outside their country taking their jobs
      That’s Spain.?
      That’s the U.K. Only here we pay everyone that hasn’t paid a penny, doesn’t deserve a penny with our money/our jobs and spend our kids future.
      FOR HOW LONG ?With money we don’t have anymore.
      Soon as I am there I may build my own house.

      ME

    • #91523
      GJ
      Participant

      The big difference between the UK and the Costa Del Sol (not all of Spain) is that more or less the entire economy was based on the property market in one way or another in either holiday or retirement homes for Northern Europeans. Those of working age on the Costa Del Sol are finding it impossible to find work. Those retired have had there income cut by about 30% ( exchange rate). Those with holiday homes are drastically reducing the amount of time they are spending in Spain.

      Because of this the bars and restaurants are closing and there owners no longer have an income.
      The retail shops have little business any more with the massive reduction in other nationalities spending.
      The swimming pool people, air conditioning and general builders are all going slowly broke, not even mentioning those working in that dreaded timeshare industry that are also out of work (Whatever you think they used to spend money)
      I feel that most of the infrastructure of the Costa Del Sol will collapse from all these problems.
      By the way I have also heard that the golfers are staying away and this is high season for golf tourism.
      I’m sorry to say that those struggling on will have to admit defeat in the end and those that are not that badly affected financially will find more and more closed shops, bars and restaurants and those living on urbs will end up in decaying ghost towns with mostly squatters and Gypsies for neighbours.
      None of this I would want to happen and I hope I am wrong but I don’t think so.
      Also as an afterthought, don’t forget how many Spanish nationals were dependant on property here. Goodstich may not worry about the Lawyers and Notaries, but they employed staff and spent money, as for the constunction workers THEY are TOAST.
      Its all very sad.

    • #91524
      Anonymous
      Participant

      @GJ wrote:

      those living on urbs will end up in decaying ghost towns with mostly squatters and Gypsies for neighbours.

      Would then the best solution be to try to purchase a property with land inland?
      squatters and Gypsies won’t adventure there…

    • #91525
      Anonymous
      Participant

      GJ
      What you say may be very true.
      Many parts of Spain did rely on construction,howeve many did not.
      Many of the construction workers that came to Spain may very well move back home to the Eastern Block( not like here they dont get freebies at our expence)
      The house boom had to stop and thats what everyone was saying as supply was more than demand.
      Perhaps that over supply in good areas may be taken up by those trapped here.
      Many parts of the U.K relied to much in the finacial sector/housing easy money.
      Town Centres die by the day.This alongside the British way of life as well.

      Its all very sad

      ME

    • #91526
      GJ
      Participant

      Sorry but the simple answer is no. Most properties inland have legal problems unless they are properly urbanised and even then be careful. And many of the ex pats used to live in places like Coin and Alhaurin and commute to the coast. So it may mean you have no neighbours at ALL.
      And nowhere to eat, drink and socialise.

    • #91528
      Anonymous
      Participant

      ……………..

    • #91529
      GJ
      Participant

      @ME wrote:

      GJ
      What you say may be very true.
      Many parts of Spain did rely on construction,howeve many did not.
      Many of the construction workers that came to Spain may very move back home.( not like here they dont get freebies at our expence)
      The house boom had to stop and thats what everyone was saying as supply was more than demand.
      Perhaps that over supply in good areas may be taken up in many areas by those trapped here.
      Many parts of the U.K relied to much in the finacial sector/housing easy money.
      Town Centres die by the day.This along the British way of life as well.

      Its all very sad
      The difference is in the UK we dont have areas totally reliant on residential tourism.
      ME

    • #91530
      GJ
      Participant

      @itsme wrote:

      Well, you said about yourself: “Genuine English/Spanish couple looking to sell this fully legal property only due to the fact that we have the opportunity to live rent free in a family home in England.”

      So you did not have any problem coming to UK as you live rent free here. But many others are not so lucky.

      But don’t you think that one part of our ‘situation’ is the guilt we feel in not being able to pay rent!! We are not a wealthy family and the house here was paid for with years of hard work by my father. If we had to pay rent here in the UK I don’t know what we would do. We can’t default on our Spanish mortgage because my father-in-law is on the escritura and they would chase him for our debts (which wouldn’t be fair). It’s thanks for both sets of parents that we are able to now work to pay what we need to each month and be able to feed our two children. That is also why I said we, in our 30’s, are lucky as we’ll be able to dig ourselves out of this mess in time. People in their 60’s who sold everything they had to go out to Spain have fewer options.

      Those who bought off-plan because someone at ‘Parador’ or ‘Medsea’ or whatever suggested that they’d make quick money or rental of 300euros a week I don’t feel sorry for. They jumped in on the bandwagon wanting to make a quick buck and got stung.[/quote]
      ç

      I’m sorry but you are missing the point completely. Many parts of the Costa Del Sol can not recover in the short, medium term.

    • #91531
      katy
      Blocked

      ME I am confused, or is it It’s me 🙄 firstly, I am not leaving Spain. You say you have a spanish mortgage, why are you not here? or have you gone back to get benefits that aren’t available here?

    • #91532
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Sorry Katy
      I am mistaken
      The way you appear to treat the Spanish /Spaniards that come on the forum and the way you run Spain down at every opportunity I thought you were one of those trapped there.Silly ME.
      No not on benefits thanks for the interest
      No didnt say I had a mortgage as that seems very tough to get.
      Many of us over here in the U.K have a little problem and the moment with our £1 being worth naff all.
      When I am coming over be sure I will let you know.

      ME

    • #91535
      katy
      Blocked

      Which spaniards are they 🙄 😆

    • #91539
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Katy

      Probably the ones you insult that think you are a typical Brit in someones elses Country.

      ME

    • #91540
      katy
      Blocked

      You may not know my bio. (mark we should have a section). I don’t sort of bring it up unlike some posters 🙄
      Spanish Grandfather (although an anglophile), sent to “work” in my G Grandparents business in Yorks…His Spanish family (Madrid) did business with the English side. Grandfather had finca close to where Banus is now. Spent many holidays here. I spoke spanish earlier than I can remember, I spent a year at uni in sevilla. Some of the “spaniards” on here are not spanish just the same as you are not a “new” poster…now piss off, you are like a mosca on my nose 😈

    • #91541
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Charming.
      Essex Girl.Is IT

      Must go. Shops open at the Friary. 😉
      Good shopping its like a second home to ME 😆

      ME

    • #91542
      Anonymous
      Participant

      ………..

    • #91543
      Anonymous
      Participant

      @itsme wrote:

      What is the solution to all of this? I personally think that the banks, in the UK and Spain, need to start lending sensibly again. People need to be able to buy a place to live and pay an affordable amount for it. I think that the average wage in Spain is 15,000 euros a year? How many local people can afford a flat if the prices are rocketing above 150,000? If a mortgage of 120,000 cost around 400 euros a month then average earners could afford a mortgage. The property market would then start moving again for everyone?

      A 120K Euros mortgage is difficult to cost 400 Euros/month, the interest rate would need to be about 2.5% for the duration of the mortage which will never happen.

      15000 Euros/year salary means that a 2 bed apt. should never cost more than 50k Euros.

    • #91544
      Anonymous
      Participant

      ………….

    • #91545
      Anonymous
      Participant

      itsme
      We clearly share more than a similar name on the forum.

      Split hairs if some wish but your message is spot on.

      ME

    • #91546
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Thanks ME. I just hope that there is a solution to this property crisis for everyone.

    • #91547
      katy
      Blocked

      My posts could be interpreted as negative but I think I am telling it like it is. Things aren’t going to change buy burying the corruption etc under the carpet. The mainly British (some other N.Europeans too) have had a raw deal here, why do you think it is mainly foreigners whose homes have been declared illegal. I live here because it is my home (for now) I want things to change here because I have considerable investment here. As people in the UK feel free to criticise the country so do I in Spain…because we want things to get better.

    • #91548
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Well
      Good common sense help and advice from the Spanish PropertyInsight posters giving us a broad insight to finding solutions may be a good start.

      ME

    • #91549
      Anonymous
      Participant

      SO…I’ll lay money that ME is Frank…. AGAIN! His posting is like a fingerprint. Master of multiple editing and smilies. Every sentence has a new line, always signs off using post name…and is over familiar for a new poster. It has Frank stamped all over it!

      What part of being barred don’t you understand Frank?

    • #91550
      Anonymous
      Participant

      @itsme wrote:

      Which it didn’t not more than about 8 years ago??

      My brother-in-law paid 57,000 euros for his very large three bedroom apartment in 2001. Ours was 100,000 in 2005 and then valued at 130,000 in 2007 for our disasterous ‘re-mortgage’.

      But, the prices can’t all go back to those as too many people, like ourselves, have mortgages and can’t drop the prices. Therefore the banks need to start lending at lower rates to enable youngsters to be able to buy and start people living in these empty buildings. Wages aren’t going to suddenly rise by 100% any time soon….

      Won’t the banks prefer to make less profit than risk the empty communities being over-run by gypsies and immigrants squatting?

      The banks cannot lend like in 2007. In 2007 they did not take the risks as
      they sold the mortgages as CDS to investors.

      Now they really take mortgages on their books and need to make sure that people can repay mortgages.

      I would say that in the next 15 years things will not get back to the 2007 style lending.

      Youngsters will be able to buy when the prices return to 3.5 anual salaries. Then their 10% deposits will be about 5000 Euros, plus 5000 purchase fee. And their 350 Euro/month mortgages will be about the same as the the rent.

    • #91563
      peterhun
      Participant

      @itsme wrote:

      My brother-in-law paid 57,000 euros for his very large three bedroom apartment in 2001. Ours was 100,000 in 2005 and then valued at 130,000 in 2007 for our disasterous ‘re-mortgage’.

      But, the prices can’t all go back to those as too many people, like ourselves, have mortgages and can’t drop the prices. Therefore the banks need to start lending at lower rates to enable youngsters to be able to buy and start people living in these empty buildings.

      You cannot make statements like that, prices will fall to whatever the market can afford – in this case the wages of a first time buyer. The world isn’t going to re-arrange itself around what your mortgage is, in the same way I cannot buy a castle at the price I determine.

      And Banks can’t lend like they did until the crash, the bubble of credit (many times higher than anything in history) has popped and it CANNOT return as the fundamental vehicle to generate this paper money has been deemed virtually illegal.

    • #91564
      Anonymous
      Participant

      @peterhun wrote:

      @itsme wrote:

      My brother-in-law paid 57,000 euros for his very large three bedroom apartment in 2001. Ours was 100,000 in 2005 and then valued at 130,000 in 2007 for our disasterous ‘re-mortgage’.

      But, the prices can’t all go back to those as too many people, like ourselves, have mortgages and can’t drop the prices. Therefore the banks need to start lending at lower rates to enable youngsters to be able to buy and start people living in these empty buildings.

      You cannot make statements like that, prices will fall to whatever the market can afford – in this case the wages of a first time buyer. The world isn’t going to re-arrange itself around what your mortgage is, in the same way I cannot buy a castle at the price I determine.

      And Banks can’t lend like they did until the crash, the bubble of credit (many times higher than anything in history) has popped and it CANNOT return as the fundamental vehicle to generate this paper money has been deemed virtually illegal.

      Dont forget that itsme also got a gift of 30000 Euros as free money from the bank in 2007. She did not realise that there is no free lunch…

      “Ours was 100,000 in 2005 and then valued at 130,000 in 2007 for our disasterous ‘re-mortgage’. “

    • #91565
      Anonymous
      Participant

      peterhun

      I’ve always shared your opinion on this, but if the developers and private sellers alike, are mortgaged up to the hilt, and already in negative equity, then I guess they will feel they have hold on, in desperate hope of price increases?. I can’t see it happening, but if it doesn’t, then something will have to give?, and huge losses will be suffered in order to get back to affordable prices, or prices people are prepared to risk, bearing in mind possible further collapse?

    • #91566
      Anonymous
      Participant

      People – don’t you see the market is cyclical. Always has been and always will be. Of course everyone understands this but i think people sometimes forget.

      We’ve enjoyed great price hikes over the past decade and squeezed the life out of the market. Yes, the credit lines have stalled but they will return – how else will banks make enough money to pay their debts!

      What really surprises me, and still does, is that people from all around the world, were prepared to pay silly money for poor quality apartment blocks in locations that are less than desirable.

      Oversupply and poor quality did not send alarm bells ringing and yet many continued to buy off plan thinking that the good times would never end. Did they intend living in these ‘investments’ – of course not – they thought some other fool would and pay them for the ‘pleasure’.

      Good property in good locations continue to hold much of their value and negative equity is less of a concern. The market will return one day – but don’t expect the prices of overdeveloped apartment blocks to return to the highs of recent years.

    • #91567
      Anonymous
      Participant

      I suspect prices will exceed those silly prices one day. Just as you said Marcoloco it’s cyclical, except the cycle expands each time it comes around.

      People will move back into the stockmarket eventually and as time goes on, their shares will be worth more than they were in the last boom.

    • #91568
      Anonymous
      Participant

      @Peter Good wrote:

      I suspect prices will exceed those silly prices one day.

      This is 100% sure. Depends when, 2015 or 2075…

    • #91571
      Anonymous
      Participant

      @flosmichael wrote:

      @Peter Good wrote:

      I suspect prices will exceed those silly prices one day.

      This is 100% sure. Depends when, 2015 or 2075…

      It really depends on the usual 3 factors:-

      1) The return of confidence.
      2) The return of cheap/easy credit.
      3) The return to other news items from the media.

      Despite politicians protesting that credit will be more tightly controlled in the future, I just don’t believe a word of it.

      As No1 returns, No2 will follow and before we know it, the new generation of Amanda Lambs will be making good-life abroad programmes for No3.

      I suspect 18 month – 2 years before we dare say the market is bouyant/increasing and probably 5 years or less before we see prices exceeding those of the last boom. In other words the usual 8 year cycle.

    • #91572
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Dont forget that itsme also got a gift of 30000 Euros as free money from the bank in 2007. She did not realise that there is no free lunch…

      “Ours was 100,000 in 2005 and then valued at 130,000 in 2007 for our disasterous ‘re-mortgage’. “[/quote]

      Um, which bit of ‘disasterous’ don’t you understand?? The dodgy bank manager and his friend STOLE that extra money so we didn’t receive a penny of it and have also been paying it back since then.

      ps, I joined this forum because I wanted to see what solutions there are about this mess not to join in a slagging match between everyone.

    • #91573
      Anonymous
      Participant

      @Peter Good wrote:

      I suspect 18 month – 2 years before we dare say the market is bouyant/increasing and probably 5 years or less before we see prices exceeding those of the last boom. In other words the usual 8 year cycle.

      I agree with you.

    • #91577
      katy
      Blocked

      Has anyone had a glance of this threads title 💡 ❓

    • #91578
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Yep
      Seems to have gone a little off course.

      “Now piss off, you are like a mosca on my nose.”

      Around that point.

      ME

    • #91579
      Anonymous
      Participant

      @flosmichael wrote:

      @Peter Good wrote:

      I suspect 18 month – 2 years before we dare say the market is bouyant/increasing and probably 5 years or less before we see prices exceeding those of the last boom. In other words the usual 8 year cycle.

      I agree with you.

      We often do flosmichael, I must admit I find it refreshing.

    • #91687
      peterhun
      Participant

      @Peter Good wrote:

      @flosmichael wrote:

      @Peter Good wrote:

      I suspect prices will exceed those silly prices one day.

      This is 100% sure. Depends when, 2015 or 2075…

      It really depends on the usual 3 factors:-

      1) The return of confidence.
      2) The return of cheap/easy credit.
      3) The return to other news items from the media.

      Despite politicians protesting that credit will be more tightly controlled in the future, I just don’t believe a word of it.

      As No1 returns, No2 will follow and before we know it, the new generation of Amanda Lambs will be making good-life abroad programmes for No3.

      I suspect 18 month – 2 years before we dare say the market is bouyant/increasing and probably 5 years or less before we see prices exceeding those of the last boom. In other words the usual 8 year cycle.

      8 year cycle? Quite obviously thats wrong as the last crash was 1990 and 1973 before that. The cycle is about 18 years peak to peak, which figures as it would allow mortgages to be largely repaid….

      >>Despite politicians protesting that credit will be more tightly controlled in the future, I just don’t believe a word of it.

      Its not just the politicians who decide that, securitised mortgage debt will be untrusted by investors. The removal of a market for that sort of debt will prevent another similar sized boom, it will require a new method of generating money that hasn’t been invented yet (and may never be). Anything that requires complex valuations will be impossible to sell and very likely illegal in the many countries. Even if only half the world bans toxic debt that will in itself half the potential for further new finance and half the potential rise in property prices.

    • #91690
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Thanks to those who think i’m a ‘numpty’ and wish to post the details of my situation on other websites to have a laugh at. It is extremely hurtful. I was just trying to explain our situation to, in a way, also get my head around the Spanish property market and try to get some feedback/and warn others who may be doubtful of their bank.

      I am so glad we now have Spanish tenants in our place and hope that I never have to deal with any Brits with regards to property over there again.

    • #91691
      katy
      Blocked

      Hi, a bit lost now, can you give us a link. ❓

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