Spanish media wakes up!

This topic contains 12 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 8 years, 10 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #55420

    katy
    Spectator

    http://www.typicallyspanish.com/news/publish/article_24990.shtml

    This one before even the UK press published anything.

  • #96573

    rt21
    Participant

    The tales of woe just seem to go on and on without any firm action by the regional or central governments to redress the wrongs that have been committed.

    If they put their heads in the sand and pretend they have firm control over the Spanish economic policy as they have over the propert market God help them.

    I have a feeling that one day there is going to be a backlash in Spain over the way the the population have been governed.

    Richard

  • #96577

    Anonymous
    Participant

    Richard

    well I hope there is?

  • #96580

    Anonymous
    Participant

    There has been a slew of articles like this in the mainstream media recently. Several in El Pais and at least one big feature in El Mundo. No attempt to blame the buyers. It’s the result of the good work being done by the likes of AUN organising protests and so on.

    The Spaniards I talk to are seething about their political leadership. Disgust with the corruption and so on. Disaffection is definitely growing.

    Mark

  • #96581

    adiep
    Participant

    @mark wrote:

    There has been a slew of articles like this in the mainstream media recently. Several in El Pais and at least one big feature in El Mundo. No attempt to blame the buyers. It’s the result of the good work being done by the likes of AUN organising protests and so on.

    The Spaniards I talk to are seething about their political leadership. Disgust with the corruption and so on. Disaffection is definitely growing.

    Mark

    Wait till they realise what “internal devaluation” means.

  • #96582

    rt21
    Participant

    Is internal devaluation a euphemism for cuts in public spending, reduced wages, reduced pensions, higher unemployment and eventually higher mortgage payments as the ECB increases interest rates to keep the Franco-German economies from overheating.

    Perhaps one day the powers that be may realise that when you have a marketable product like the the spanish property market you have to work hard at ensuring that your customers and potential customers retain confidence in the product. What you don’t do is show total indifference to their concerns when they experience problems. It only takes a short time to lose a good reputation and a very long time to regain it

  • #96583

    adiep
    Participant

    @rt21 wrote:

    Is internal devaluation a euphemism for cuts in public spending, reduced wages, reduced pensions, higher unemployment and eventually higher mortgage payments as the ECB increases interest rates to keep the Franco-German economies from overheating.

    Yes, thats the one.

    @rt21 wrote:

    Perhaps one day the powers that be may realise that when you have a marketable product like the the spanish property market you have to work hard at ensuring that your customers and potential customers retain confidence in the product. What you don’t do is show total indifference to their concerns when they experience problems. It only takes a short time to lose a good reputation and a very long time to regain it

    Lets face it, most spaniards are bloody idiots, so dont hold your breath for those powers that be…

  • #96586

    Anonymous
    Participant

    Most Spaniards are intelligent, sensitive, family orientated individuals, who are proud of their country and heritage.

  • #96588

    Anonymous
    Participant

    Not the political ones 😆 .
    BTW – here’s the El País article about corruption in Valencia:
    http://www.elpais.com/articulo/Comunidad/Valenciana/Corrupcion/urbanismo/salvaje/elpepiespval/20100207elpval_2/Tes
    ‘Corrupción y urbanismo salvaje – La vía penal destapa la ineficaz disciplina urbanística del Consell’. It mentions Catral, Bigastro, Zarra, Llíber, Polop and Montroi.

  • #96592

    Anonymous
    Participant

    I too am hearing serious discontent about the government. But, it seems to me that the problems are so great that they are impossible to correct in the short term (maybe 4 years).

    I do not wish to be an apologist for the politicians here, as I think they are weak and ineffective.

    However, does anyone really think that a new government will fix this?

    Elected officials will always try and do (or say) what gets the voted into power, and will take short term populist measures to stay there. It seems to me that the issues in Spain need a more serious, and long term approach.

  • #96593

    adiep
    Participant

    @maximus wrote:

    Most Spaniards are intelligent, sensitive, family orientated individuals, who are proud of their country and heritage.

    You are right maximus, they are, however its a tad frustrating seeing whats happening to spain whilst most spaniards are unaware of the real depth of the problems.

  • #96598

    logan
    Participant

    Historically Spain has always been badly governed with inept leadership. Pre civil war Spain was governed to quote Gerald Brennan by ” hard-drinking, whoring, horse-loving aristocracy” who ruled “over the most starved and down-trodden race of agricultural labourers in Europe.” Miguel Primo de Rivera being a prime example.
    Then they got rid of Alfonso and Franco took over with iron fist and jackboot leadership. Post Franco Spain can hardly claim to have had any examples of decent inspiring leadership.
    Spain is a new democracy they are learning how to do it. Coming of age if you like. If they seem clueless that’s because generally speaking they are. So are their institutions. There is no blueprint for pluralism in Spain. The Catholic Church used to run the country and that’s hardly a institution that can claim any good governance of people.
    The problem is peoples expectations are high. Disappointment is an inevitable side effect of democratic systems. All political careers end in failure.

  • #96599

    Anonymous
    Participant

    @logan wrote:

    The problem is peoples expectations are high. Disappointment is an inevitable side effect of democratic systems.

    I agree.

    It’s interesting (to me) to hear some middle aged Spanish tell me that life was better under Franco. I do wonder if this was due to lower expectations, and therefore less disappointments. I would have guessed that things were more stable under Franco too, but I’m no historian.

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