Spanish NIE numbers: Why you need one, and how to get one in or outside of Spain


If you own property in Spain, or live here as a resident, you are going to need an N.I.E. number. This section explains what an NIE number is, why you need one, and how to get one, either in our outside of Spain.

Spanish NIE Number Guide

This guide is about Spanish NIE numbers for the purpose of buying property in Spain. If you need an NIE number for another purpose, for example to work in Spain, the process might be different. The rules, or the application of the rules, can vary from place to place, and can change without warning. As a result, this guide can be temporarily out of date from time to time.

What is an N.I.E Number?

N.I.E. is an abbreviation for Número de Identidad de Extranjero, which translates as Identification Number for Foreigners, or Foreigners’ Identification Number if you prefer.

The NIE is your all-purpose identification and tax number in Spain. You need it for everything that involves a tramite or official process in Spain. For example, you will need an NIE number to buy a property, buy a car, get connected to the utilities and, most importantly as far as the Spanish state is concerned, pay your taxes. Without an NIE number, the Spanish tax authorities are unable to assess or process annual tax payments such as income tax (IRPF), and the annual wealth tax (Patrimonio), both of which are declared by resident and non-resident property owners.

NIE number certificates are now being issued with a 3-month validity from the time of issue, after which you are expected to apply for residency, or register as a non-resident. So after three months the certificate is no longer valid, at least in principle. Some notaries may refuse to accept a certificate that has expired, which could cause problems for property buyers trying to sign deeds more than three months after obtaining their NIE certificate. To avoid problems you should sort out your NIE number on your last trip to Spain, when you find a property you want to buy. If the conveyancing process takes longer than three months, you may need a gestor to reapply for your NIE number, or register you as non-resident in time.

If you are an EU citizen and spend longer than 3 months in Spain after getting your NIE number, you are required to register and get a government certificate that shows your NIE number.

Who needs an NIE in Spain?

1. Any foreigner who becomes resident for tax purposes in Spain needs an NIE number in Spain.
2. Any non-resident foreigner who buys property in Spain. If a couple buys a property in Spain together, and they register the property in both their names, then both of them must obtain an NIE number in Spain.
3. Anyone who wants to work in Spain, or start a business in Spain.

When do you need to have an NIE number?

If you are buying property in Spain, then you need to have an NIE number by the time you sign the deeds of purchase before notary, an event known in Spanish as the escritura.

Getting your NIE number in time for escritura means applying at least 1 month before hand if you are applying in Spain, and at least 2 months before hand if you are applying via a consulate abroad. The actual time it takes depends upon where you apply, and the time of the year. You might be able to get an NIE number in person in Spain in a couple of days, but it could also take weeks, so best allow yourself plenty of time.

How do you apply for an NIE number?

The first thing to understand is that dealing with the Spanish bureaucracy is often a perplexing, not to mention frustrating affair. The way they interpret the regulations in Andalusia might differ from the way they interpret the same rules in Catalonia. In one area, for example Barcelona, you need to book an appointment online in advance to request your NIE number, then spend hours waiting in a queue, whilst in other areas you can just turn up and get everything done in half an hour. I have confirmed for myself that the rules are inconsistently applied, which makes it difficult to prepare a guide to NIE numbers.

So keeping in mind that the process and interpretation of requirements might be different depending on how and where you apply for an NIE number, here is a general guide that explains the official requirements and the process as it should work (but might not)

There are three ways to apply for a Spanish NIE number:

1. Apply in person in Spain.
2. Apply in person via a Spanish Consulate abroad.
3. Apply through a representative in Spain

1. Applying for NIE number in person in Spain

Spanish N.I.E form

NIE form example – click to enlarge

Applying in person for an NIE number whilst in Spain is a relatively straightforward procedure. The only inconvenience is that you may have to wait for several hours in a queue in order to submit your application at a Spanish police station. It does depend upon the police station where you apply, and the time of day (early is better). With a bit of luck you will be in and out in half an hour or less.

The process is as follows:

1) Prepare the necessary documentation:

  • All applicants: Two copies of the Ex-15 application form filled out and signed . The Spanish name for the NIE form is Solicitud de Número de Identidad de Extranjero (NIE) y Certificados (EX-15), and you can download this NIE application form by clicking on the link below.
  • All applicants: An original document (plus a photocopy) that justifies your reason for applying for an NIE number, such as a private purchase contract for a property, deposit contract, or a mortgage approval.
  • EU nationals: Your passport and a photocopy of the main page of your passport (the page that includes your photo, name, passport number, address, etc.).
  • Non-EU nationals: Your passport and a photocopy of your entire passport (all pages), plus proof of your legal entry into Spain (for instance a landing card, known in Spanish as a declaración de entrada or a título de viaje or cédula de inscripción). Some Oficinas de Extranjeros might accept a valid entry stamp in your passport as proof of legal entry. To be on the safe side non-EU nationals might also want to take along two recent passport size colour photographs with a plain coloured background.

To download the form go to the Government’s Extranjería page and look for Solicitud de Número de Identidad de Extranjero (NIE) y Certificados (EX-15)

2) Take all documentation in person to the appropriate place of submission.

You have to go to one of the immigration offices (oficinas de extranjeros) that are usually found in designated police stations (comisaría de policía), preferably in the area where you are buying your property. If there is no immigration office in your area then it should be possible to make your application through a local police station. In any event the local police station will be able to tell you the best place to go to apply for an NIE in your area.

In Barcelona, and some other places, you have to request an appointment online using the “Certificados EU” (for EU nationals) option at the Public Administration website. You might have to book an appointment a month in advance – you can’t just turn up. (More information from the Public Administration website in Spanish)

You will have to pay a tax of around €10.00 at the nearest bank branch after making your application, then take proof of this payment (the stamped receipt from the bank) back to the Oficina de Extranjeros. That completes the application process.

For more information on the procedures and where to find your closest immigration office go to the Public Administration website.

3) Collect NIE number after a few days

After you have submitted your NIE application you will be given an official receipt (resguardo) and a date after which you can return to collect your NIE document. It might be a couple of days later, or a couple of weeks – the police station will tell you. The time it takes varies by region and time of the year.

You do not have to collect your NIE in person – anyone can collect it for you if they have the official receipt or resguardo you were given when you submitted your application.

The time it takes to get an NIE varies greatly by region. Whilst it is still common in most areas to wait 15 days or more before collecting an NIE, in some areas, for instance Oviedo, in Asturias, (North Spain), you can apply for, and collect, an NIE in one single visit, which might not take longer than half an hour.

Generally speaking, it is also quicker to obtain an NIE from a local tax office than from one of the designated police stations. Applications via a tax office tend to take a few days, compared to a few weeks via police stations. Applying via a tax office does mean, however, that the Spanish tax office is aware of your situation as an owner of property in Spain. This makes it more likely that the tax office will pursue you for taxes related to owning property in Spain, such as the wealth tax (patrimonio), and income tax (IRPF), which all property owners in Spain have to pay, irrespective of fiscal residence.

2. Applying for an NIE number in person via a Spanish Consulate abroad

You can also apply for an NIE from Spanish consulates around the world if you do not have the time to apply whilst you are in Spain.

The process is as follows:

1) Prepare the necessary documentation:

  • EU nationals: Your passport and a photocopy of the main page of your passport (the page that includes your photo, name, passport number, address, etc.). Non-EU nationals: Your passport and a photocopy of your entire passport.
  • 2 copies of the appropriate application form duly completed but NOT SIGNED as you will need to sign in the presence of a consular official. The Spanish consulate will not be able to provide you with this form so you must obtain it beforehand. I strongly recommend you ring the consulate beforehand to check the latest situation as the procedures do change and these instructions may already be out of date.
  • A self-addressed envelope (no stamp)
  • An envelope addressed to:Comisaría General de Extranjería y Documentación
    Dirección General de Policia
    C/ General Pardiñas, 90
    28006 Madrid
  • In the UK it appears that there is no longer any fee to pay (you used to have to pay a cheque of £22 to “The Spanish Consulate General”). You may wish to ring the consulate beforehand to check this, or just take your cheque book along to be on the safe side.
  • You might also have to produce an original document (plus a photocopy) that justifies your reason for applying for an NIE number. This documentation might not be necessary, but best have it with you just in case. If you don’t have it, then don’t worry too much, as both London and Manchester consulates say they don’t require it.

2) Take all documentation in person to your nearest Spanish Consulate.

You have to go in person with all the relevant documentation to your nearest Spanish consulate. The Spanish Consulate cannot issue NIE numbers; it only acts as a “postal box” between the applicant and the competent authorities in Spain. Once you have submitted your application through the Consulate they will not be able to provide you with any further information on the status of your application. For any further information or enquires as to the status of your application you should write to the address given above for the Comisaría General de Extranjería y Documentación.

For contact details of Spanish Consulates in the United Kingdom see below:

3) Await notification from the Spanish authorities

If all goes well you should receive your number through the post within 4 – 6 weeks. IMPORTANT NOTE: If you want to have the NIE number sent to your address abroad, make sure you print this address very carefully on the application form, and also include a self-addressed envelope (no stamp). The website of the Spanish consulate in London says you have to use an address in Spain, but the consulate in Manchester says you can have your NIE sent to you in the UK. This is conflicting advice, and I cannot tell you for sure which version is correct.

Spanish Embassy in the United Kingdom:

Get contact details from the embassy website

There is also a Spanish Consulate in Edinburgh and Northern Ireland – ring the Embassy for more information.

3. Authorise a third party to obtain you NIE number on your behalf

The Spanish Government now permits foreigners to authorise a third party to obtain an NIE number on their behalf, as I reported in this article The Spanish Government now allows foreigners to get an NIE number through a legal representative. There was a period of time when this was not possible.

As a result, you can now authorise someone to get your NIE number for you in Spain. Once authorised they take care of the whole process for you. There are numerous companies now offering this service. To do this you need to:

  1. Grant them a poder, or power of attorney signed before notary, expressly granting permission to request an NIE number on your behalf.
  2. Let them have your passport, or send them a notarised copy of your passport (copia legitimada). Getting a copy of your passport in Spain is easy and cheap to do with a quick visit to a notary. If you get it from a notary outside of Spain you will also need the Hague Apostille. Be warned that some oficinas de extranjería do not accept passport copies that have been notarised outside of Spain – they only accept copies done by a Spanish notary.

If you go to a notary outside of Spain, the documentation will also need the Hague Apostille (but not if you go to the Spanish embassy or consulate).

British Notary Publics are generally solicitors and practise in solicitors’ firms. I recommend you telephone one or two solicitors’ firms in your area and enquire as to whether they have a Notary Public or, advise you as to where the nearest one practises.

+ Find a Notary Public in the UK

Be sure to take your original passports to the Notary appointment.

For more information (mainly in Spanish) on the Spanish NIE number application process and Spanish consulates worldwide check out: