HolaBank give you a helping hand with the bureaucracy you face in Spain (publicity)

HolaBank clients get free help dealing with the Spanish bureaucracy.

When you live in Spain, or even just own a second home here, you can’t avoid a certain amount of Spanish bureaucracy, which can seem exasperating to the uninitiated. Dealing with the bureaucracy can be a time-consuming pain in any country, but even more so in a foreign country where you don’t know the ropes, and don’t speak the language.

But when it comes to dealing with the Spanish bureaucracy at any level, help is at hand for clients of HolaBank, who get unlimited free advice on any bureaucratic procedure from a team of experts on hand to advise them by phone or email in a language they understand.

HolaBank is part of CaixaBank – one of the leading banks in Spain – and HolaBank is specifically organised around the needs of expats and second-home owners from abroad, offering products and services tailored to their needs in English and other languages.

Whether you need to register a car, get a fishing licence, request a copy of an official document, make a tax declaration, or deal with a property transaction, to name just a few examples, HolaBank’s team of experts will help you understand the steps you have to take. Called the HolaBank Agency Service, this help is free of charge to HolaBank clients.

Once you understand the bureaucratic challenges you face HolaBank can recommend you, if necessary, an administrative professional to get the job done with a 25% discount of the standard fee, and a network of trusted professionals all over Spain.

HolaBank clients get far more than just competitive banking services when they live or own property in Spain. Visit the HolaBank Agency Service webpage for more information. Alternatively click the banner below or call +34 91 832 98 98 to find out how HolaBank can help you deal with the bureaucracy in Spain.

About SPI News Feed

SPI News Feed provides general news about the Spanish property market and related articles translated from the Spanish press. For more in depth news, analysis, and opinion, see Mark Stücklin's blog.