Why are british not buying in traditional Spanish areas?

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This topic contains 74 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Anonymous Anonymous 8 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #53590
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I am new in this forum. First, let me tell you that I am a Spaniard and I am convinced the Spanish housing market will fall down a lot in the following months/years.

    My family has an old house in a beautiful town in the Spanish south-east. It is in the old part of the town (where low-middle class Spaniards live in that town). Streets are very narrow, and cars must go at around 5 km/h or less. People just sit in the afternoons in the middle of the street, talking with neighbours. Shops are cheap and shopkeepers are nice. In other words: it is not luxurious, but I think it is very close to what foreigners have in their heads about the idealized Spain. Additionally, in a 5-min walk you are in the beach.

    However, I see foreigners keep buying (now much less, of course) detached houses in some urbanized areas, in the middle of nowhere, far away from local towns, and far away from the beach. The only advantage is to have a golf court around there.

    But the prices in my area are much lower, even though they offer a much higher ‘real experience’. I have been thinking in buying a house next to mine and to build on the land about four small houses (my house is old but very big). But my concern is lack of potential buyers. I do not see many british relocating into that area. For sure, there are a couple of them, but not many.

    May I ask why british people are not flooding those areas? (pros: low prices, traditional lifestyle). Is it just lack of information? (there are no big companies publicizing those areas). Or that in fact british are not interested in this kind of housing, for some (for me) unknown reason?

  • #77638
    Profile photo of Melosine
    Melosine
    Participant

    Probably because most Brits want the comfort zone of other English people and the amenities on the complexes .
    Many also desire the amenities they are used too at home. Fish and chip shops, Curry and Chinese restaurants and English beer 🙄

    Most dream of coming to live in Spain because they holiday on the Costa’s…where all the above is available…which is not the real Spain at all.
    I can say this because I do live in real Spain. Not a Brit style establishment, fortunately, for miles.

  • #77813
    Profile photo of Melosine
    Melosine
    Participant

    Probably because most Brits want the comfort zone of other English people and the amenities on the complexes .
    Many also desire the amenities they are used too at home. Fish and chip shops, Curry and Chinese restaurants and English beer 🙄

    Most dream of coming to live in Spain because they holiday on the Costa’s…where all the above is available…which is not the real Spain at all.
    I can say this because I do live in real Spain. Not a Brit style establishment, fortunately, for miles.

  • #77639
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Of course, this is the real situation, as you describe. My question is then: if I build four houses, with high level of luxury, thinking in british clients, in the area I describe, do you think there would be a market for high net worth individuals? I am planning in keeping one for myself (since the current house is too big for vacations, and too old) but having good neighbours around.

  • #77815
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Of course, this is the real situation, as you describe. My question is then: if I build four houses, with high level of luxury, thinking in british clients, in the area I describe, do you think there would be a market for high net worth individuals? I am planning in keeping one for myself (since the current house is too big for vacations, and too old) but having good neighbours around.

  • #77640
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    farstar wrote:
    May I ask why british people are not flooding those areas? (pros: low prices, traditional lifestyle). Is it just lack of information? (there are no big companies publicizing those areas). Or that in fact british are not interested in this kind of housing, for some (for me) unknown reason?

    Which area are you from?

  • #77817
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    farstar wrote:
    May I ask why british people are not flooding those areas? (pros: low prices, traditional lifestyle). Is it just lack of information? (there are no big companies publicizing those areas). Or that in fact british are not interested in this kind of housing, for some (for me) unknown reason?

    Which area are you from?

  • #77642
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    The town is called Águilas, just in Murcia and very close to Almería province. Traditionally, it was a no-foreigners tourism town. In the last years, there has been an explosion of urbanization outside the town, and prices are very high in privileged locations. But the town itself, especially the areas on hills (where you have fresh air, helping to survive hot summers) are cheap still.

  • #77821
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    The town is called Águilas, just in Murcia and very close to Almería province. Traditionally, it was a no-foreigners tourism town. In the last years, there has been an explosion of urbanization outside the town, and prices are very high in privileged locations. But the town itself, especially the areas on hills (where you have fresh air, helping to survive hot summers) are cheap still.

  • #77643
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    We have been searching for a house in inland Spain, mainly Granada, for quite some time…. We do not wish to live on an “urbanisation” – our choice is to be amongst the locals if possible and, to that end, we’ve been learning Spanish. Thankfully, not all Brits want to live on the urbs with their home comforts.
    You don’t say where your house is though….

  • #77823
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    We have been searching for a house in inland Spain, mainly Granada, for quite some time…. We do not wish to live on an “urbanisation” – our choice is to be amongst the locals if possible and, to that end, we’ve been learning Spanish. Thankfully, not all Brits want to live on the urbs with their home comforts.
    You don’t say where your house is though….

  • #77825
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Looks nice, farstar…..do you have a good/honest Mayor???

    http://www.todoaguilas.com/english.htm

  • #77644
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Looks nice, farstar…..do you have a good/honest Mayor???

    http://www.todoaguilas.com/english.htm

  • #77827
    Profile photo of Melosine
    Melosine
    Participant

    farstar
    That’s our area 8) .
    Fell instantly in love with Aguilas . It has charm and an ambience that many of the so called “in places” lack. I disagree it is luxurious just not flashy.
    Folk want real Spain then this is it and hopefully it will always stay that way.
    Appreciate there are new urbanisations on the perimeter but not sufficient to lose the charm .
    However speaking some Spanish is a must here.

  • #77645
    Profile photo of Melosine
    Melosine
    Participant

    farstar
    That’s our area 8) .
    Fell instantly in love with Aguilas . It has charm and an ambience that many of the so called “in places” lack. I disagree it is luxurious just not flashy.
    Folk want real Spain then this is it and hopefully it will always stay that way.
    Appreciate there are new urbanisations on the perimeter but not sufficient to lose the charm .
    However speaking some Spanish is a must here.

  • #77831
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    farstar wrote:
    The town is called Águilas, just in Murcia and very close to Almería province. Traditionally, it was a no-foreigners tourism town. In the last years, there has been an explosion of urbanization outside the town, and prices are very high in privileged locations. But the town itself, especially the areas on hills (where you have fresh air, helping to survive hot summers) are cheap still.

    I was there one month ago when we exited the Cartagena-Vera highway. Ther city is nice but I found San Juan de los Terreros a bit more scenic.

    There were some posters for houses/apartments and prices did not seem lower than other areas. Why do you think that prices are cheaper than say Vera or Garrucha?
    Or is it that the posters only advertize the privileged locations?

  • #77647
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    farstar wrote:
    The town is called Águilas, just in Murcia and very close to Almería province. Traditionally, it was a no-foreigners tourism town. In the last years, there has been an explosion of urbanization outside the town, and prices are very high in privileged locations. But the town itself, especially the areas on hills (where you have fresh air, helping to survive hot summers) are cheap still.

    I was there one month ago when we exited the Cartagena-Vera highway. Ther city is nice but I found San Juan de los Terreros a bit more scenic.

    There were some posters for houses/apartments and prices did not seem lower than other areas. Why do you think that prices are cheaper than say Vera or Garrucha?
    Or is it that the posters only advertize the privileged locations?

  • #77837
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    “However, I see foreigners keep buying (now much less, of course) detached houses in some urbanized areas, in the middle of nowhere, far away from local towns, and far away from the beach. The only advantage is to have a golf court around there.”
    But it is all many see. Remember, if they go to the resorts, they see the nice photos and models in the shop window, they are given a glossy brochure on arrival and when retuned home, they see the ads, brochures, etc., but never for the places you mention.

    “But my concern is lack of potential buyers. I do not see many british relocating into that area. For sure, there are a couple of them, but not many.”
    The difficulty is that yes they are out there, but how do you find them, unles you do mass marketing.

    “May I ask why british people are not flooding those areas? (pros: low prices, traditional lifestyle).”
    You reply to yourself
    “lack of information? (there are no big companies publicizing those areas)”

    “Or that in fact british are not interested in this kind of housing, for some (for me) unknown reason”
    That has been responded to above. Fish and chips anyone?

  • #77650
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    “However, I see foreigners keep buying (now much less, of course) detached houses in some urbanized areas, in the middle of nowhere, far away from local towns, and far away from the beach. The only advantage is to have a golf court around there.”
    But it is all many see. Remember, if they go to the resorts, they see the nice photos and models in the shop window, they are given a glossy brochure on arrival and when retuned home, they see the ads, brochures, etc., but never for the places you mention.

    “But my concern is lack of potential buyers. I do not see many british relocating into that area. For sure, there are a couple of them, but not many.”
    The difficulty is that yes they are out there, but how do you find them, unles you do mass marketing.

    “May I ask why british people are not flooding those areas? (pros: low prices, traditional lifestyle).”
    You reply to yourself
    “lack of information? (there are no big companies publicizing those areas)”

    “Or that in fact british are not interested in this kind of housing, for some (for me) unknown reason”
    That has been responded to above. Fish and chips anyone?

  • #77839
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @melosine wrote:

    farstar
    That’s our area 8) .
    Fell instantly in love with Aguilas . It has charm and an ambience that many of the so called “in places” lack. I disagree it is luxurious just not flashy.
    Folk want real Spain then this is it and hopefully it will always stay that way.
    Appreciate there are new urbanisations on the perimeter but not sufficient to lose the charm .
    However speaking some Spanish is a must here.

    I still remember when I was a child and I was almost alone with my parents in the beaches at about 3km from the town in August. This does not exist anymore. But it is still nice, and it still keeps its charm. Tourists are most children and grandchildren from old emigrants.

  • #77651
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @melosine wrote:

    farstar
    That’s our area 8) .
    Fell instantly in love with Aguilas . It has charm and an ambience that many of the so called “in places” lack. I disagree it is luxurious just not flashy.
    Folk want real Spain then this is it and hopefully it will always stay that way.
    Appreciate there are new urbanisations on the perimeter but not sufficient to lose the charm .
    However speaking some Spanish is a must here.

    I still remember when I was a child and I was almost alone with my parents in the beaches at about 3km from the town in August. This does not exist anymore. But it is still nice, and it still keeps its charm. Tourists are most children and grandchildren from old emigrants.

  • #77841
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @ralita wrote:

    @farstar wrote:
    The town is called Águilas, just in Murcia and very close to Almería province. Traditionally, it was a no-foreigners tourism town. In the last years, there has been an explosion of urbanization outside the town, and prices are very high in privileged locations. But the town itself, especially the areas on hills (where you have fresh air, helping to survive hot summers) are cheap still.

    I was there one month ago when we exited the Cartagena-Vera highway. Ther city is nice but I found San Juan de los Terreros a bit more scenic.

    There were some posters for houses/apartments and prices did not seem lower than other areas. Why do you think that prices are cheaper than say Vera or Garrucha?
    Or is it that the posters only advertize the privileged locations?

    The highly advertised prices are only for tourists. People who sell old houses in the old part of the town do not even publish the offer for tourists, it is only a mouth-to-mouth transaction, among neighbours and friends.

    Vera and Garrucha are much more touristic (and ugly in my opinion). I know that there are hugely discounted offers there.

  • #77652
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @ralita wrote:

    @farstar wrote:
    The town is called Águilas, just in Murcia and very close to Almería province. Traditionally, it was a no-foreigners tourism town. In the last years, there has been an explosion of urbanization outside the town, and prices are very high in privileged locations. But the town itself, especially the areas on hills (where you have fresh air, helping to survive hot summers) are cheap still.

    I was there one month ago when we exited the Cartagena-Vera highway. Ther city is nice but I found San Juan de los Terreros a bit more scenic.

    There were some posters for houses/apartments and prices did not seem lower than other areas. Why do you think that prices are cheaper than say Vera or Garrucha?
    Or is it that the posters only advertize the privileged locations?

    The highly advertised prices are only for tourists. People who sell old houses in the old part of the town do not even publish the offer for tourists, it is only a mouth-to-mouth transaction, among neighbours and friends.

    Vera and Garrucha are much more touristic (and ugly in my opinion). I know that there are hugely discounted offers there.

  • #77843
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    The difficulty is that yes they are out there, but how do you find them, unles you do mass marketing.

    This is the problem.

  • #77653
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    The difficulty is that yes they are out there, but how do you find them, unles you do mass marketing.

    This is the problem.

  • #77847
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    “People who sell old houses in the old part of the town do not even publish the offer for tourists, it is only a mouth-to-mouth transaction, among neighbours and friends.”
    Another reason why the foreigners do not end up in the Old Towns, unless they really seek out, as I know from my own experience when searching for myself in one of the “Old Towns”

  • #77655
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    “People who sell old houses in the old part of the town do not even publish the offer for tourists, it is only a mouth-to-mouth transaction, among neighbours and friends.”
    Another reason why the foreigners do not end up in the Old Towns, unless they really seek out, as I know from my own experience when searching for myself in one of the “Old Towns”

  • #77849
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    So, let me make a little bit of “british market analysis”:

    in case you were interested in living / having vacation in a place similar to the one I describe, what would you prefer (taking into account costs too, of course):

    1. The typical small house, with a small “patio” in the background, with an ‘old-fashioned’ construction; this would be quite like all the other houses in the neighbourhood; disadvantage: quality standards not quite up to a high british level;
    2. A beautiful house, high quality construction at the level of a good british house; the problem (or advantage) is that it would stand out against the neighbours; the advantage is that the price/quality relationship would be good;
    3. An apartment in a building with high quality construction; the problem (or advantage) is that it would stand out against the neighbours; the advantage is that the price/quality relationship would be good;

  • #77656
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    So, let me make a little bit of “british market analysis”:

    in case you were interested in living / having vacation in a place similar to the one I describe, what would you prefer (taking into account costs too, of course):

    1. The typical small house, with a small “patio” in the background, with an ‘old-fashioned’ construction; this would be quite like all the other houses in the neighbourhood; disadvantage: quality standards not quite up to a high british level;
    2. A beautiful house, high quality construction at the level of a good british house; the problem (or advantage) is that it would stand out against the neighbours; the advantage is that the price/quality relationship would be good;
    3. An apartment in a building with high quality construction; the problem (or advantage) is that it would stand out against the neighbours; the advantage is that the price/quality relationship would be good;

  • #77851
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I know Aguilas. It’s a nice little town. The reason why foreigners don’t buy there is because they don’t know about it, because the big agents never brought them there in numbers (no big new developments paying high commissions). And if they did, it would ruin it.

    Buy you can forget about high net worth buyers in Almeria. To generalise, it’s a destination for eccentrics and budget buyers. People with big budgets go to the Balearics, Costa Brava, Marbella, Javea, and a few other places. Rich people generally want the option of smart restaurants and smart shops, smart homes, wealthy neighbours, and all the other things that rich people like to have around and can afford. They also like very easy access. The Almerian coastline doesn’t have what it takes to attract the rich, so don’t waste your money building something with them in mind. Having said that, an attractive, good quality villa that offers value for money in the area should sell well to British and other foreign buyers, so long as the price makes sense given the area. Of course, you also have to know how to find them.

    Quite unusual to have someone thinking of building actually bother to ask why people buy and what they want. It always amazes me how developers in Spain pay no attention to market research, which explains why so much of the new property in Spain is so awful. If developers spent a bit of time and money finding out what people actually want to buy, property in Spain might not seem so expensive for what it is. It would also be much easier to sell in today’s market, where buyers are well informed, and looking for attractive quality. In the boom developers could sell any old rubbish at any price, but not anymore.

    Mark

  • #77657
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I know Aguilas. It’s a nice little town. The reason why foreigners don’t buy there is because they don’t know about it, because the big agents never brought them there in numbers (no big new developments paying high commissions). And if they did, it would ruin it.

    Buy you can forget about high net worth buyers in Almeria. To generalise, it’s a destination for eccentrics and budget buyers. People with big budgets go to the Balearics, Costa Brava, Marbella, Javea, and a few other places. Rich people generally want the option of smart restaurants and smart shops, smart homes, wealthy neighbours, and all the other things that rich people like to have around and can afford. They also like very easy access. The Almerian coastline doesn’t have what it takes to attract the rich, so don’t waste your money building something with them in mind. Having said that, an attractive, good quality villa that offers value for money in the area should sell well to British and other foreign buyers, so long as the price makes sense given the area. Of course, you also have to know how to find them.

    Quite unusual to have someone thinking of building actually bother to ask why people buy and what they want. It always amazes me how developers in Spain pay no attention to market research, which explains why so much of the new property in Spain is so awful. If developers spent a bit of time and money finding out what people actually want to buy, property in Spain might not seem so expensive for what it is. It would also be much easier to sell in today’s market, where buyers are well informed, and looking for attractive quality. In the boom developers could sell any old rubbish at any price, but not anymore.

    Mark

  • #77853
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @mark wrote:

    I know Aguilas. It’s a nice little town. The reason why foreigners don’t buy there is because they don’t know about it, because the big agents never brought them there in numbers (no big new developments paying high commissions). And if they did, it would ruin it.

    Buy you can forget about high net worth buyers in Almeria. To generalise, it’s a destination for eccentrics and budget buyers. People with big budgets go to the Balearics, Costa Brava, Marbella, Javea, and a few other places. Rich people generally want the option of smart restaurants and smart shops, smart homes, wealthy neighbours, and all the other things that rich people like to have around and can afford. They also like very easy access. The Almerian coastline doesn’t have what it takes to attract the rich, so don’t waste your money building something with them in mind. Having said that, an attractive, good quality villa that offers value for money in the area should sell well to British and other foreign buyers, so long as the price makes sense given the area. Of course, you also have to know how to find them.

    Quite unusual to have someone thinking of building actually bother to ask why people buy and what they want. It always amazes me how developers in Spain pay no attention to market research, which explains why so much of the new property in Spain is so awful. If developers spent a bit of time and money finding out what people actually want to buy, property in Spain might not seem so expensive for what it is. It would also be much easier to sell in today’s market, where buyers are well informed, and looking for attractive quality. In the boom developers could sell any old rubbish at any price, but not anymore.

    Mark

    I think you are right. But for myself, it is just the opposite: I am a trader in a big city, and what I want when I have holidays is not expensive restaurants or having rich people as neighbours (this is my “normal” life) but just the opposite: to have a “normal” life with normal people, that are not stressed, and see life with different eyes and mentality. A relaxed one. I like to listen how neighbours sing, how their children dance in the middle of the street and their parents laugh with them, to sit down just in the middle of the street, enjoying the fresh air, talking with the neighbours.

    I have never built a house for myself in my life. I am thinking in doing it just because that house is too big and too old, and I was thinking in building about four of them, and keeping one for myself. It just makes sense to me to ask possible buyers what they would like to have. I agree that in Spain people have done lots of stupid things in the last years, and many apartments will not be bought at all. I should be paid to live in some of those places. But there will always be good places, with “something” attractive, at the right price.

  • #77658
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @mark wrote:

    I know Aguilas. It’s a nice little town. The reason why foreigners don’t buy there is because they don’t know about it, because the big agents never brought them there in numbers (no big new developments paying high commissions). And if they did, it would ruin it.

    Buy you can forget about high net worth buyers in Almeria. To generalise, it’s a destination for eccentrics and budget buyers. People with big budgets go to the Balearics, Costa Brava, Marbella, Javea, and a few other places. Rich people generally want the option of smart restaurants and smart shops, smart homes, wealthy neighbours, and all the other things that rich people like to have around and can afford. They also like very easy access. The Almerian coastline doesn’t have what it takes to attract the rich, so don’t waste your money building something with them in mind. Having said that, an attractive, good quality villa that offers value for money in the area should sell well to British and other foreign buyers, so long as the price makes sense given the area. Of course, you also have to know how to find them.

    Quite unusual to have someone thinking of building actually bother to ask why people buy and what they want. It always amazes me how developers in Spain pay no attention to market research, which explains why so much of the new property in Spain is so awful. If developers spent a bit of time and money finding out what people actually want to buy, property in Spain might not seem so expensive for what it is. It would also be much easier to sell in today’s market, where buyers are well informed, and looking for attractive quality. In the boom developers could sell any old rubbish at any price, but not anymore.

    Mark

    I think you are right. But for myself, it is just the opposite: I am a trader in a big city, and what I want when I have holidays is not expensive restaurants or having rich people as neighbours (this is my “normal” life) but just the opposite: to have a “normal” life with normal people, that are not stressed, and see life with different eyes and mentality. A relaxed one. I like to listen how neighbours sing, how their children dance in the middle of the street and their parents laugh with them, to sit down just in the middle of the street, enjoying the fresh air, talking with the neighbours.

    I have never built a house for myself in my life. I am thinking in doing it just because that house is too big and too old, and I was thinking in building about four of them, and keeping one for myself. It just makes sense to me to ask possible buyers what they would like to have. I agree that in Spain people have done lots of stupid things in the last years, and many apartments will not be bought at all. I should be paid to live in some of those places. But there will always be good places, with “something” attractive, at the right price.

  • #77855
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    farstar wrote:
    The highly advertised prices are only for tourists. People who sell old houses in the old part of the town do not even publish the offer for tourists, it is only a mouth-to-mouth transaction, among neighbours and friends.

    Vera and Garrucha are much more touristic (and ugly in my opinion). I know that there are hugely discounted offers there.

    So how could a person not living in Aguillas (say somebody living in Madrid or Granada) find out about the people who sell the old houses? Is it like a little secret? 🙂

    I perfectly agree that Vera and Garrucha are ugly, Garrucha really stroke with the ugliness.

  • #77659
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    farstar wrote:
    The highly advertised prices are only for tourists. People who sell old houses in the old part of the town do not even publish the offer for tourists, it is only a mouth-to-mouth transaction, among neighbours and friends.

    Vera and Garrucha are much more touristic (and ugly in my opinion). I know that there are hugely discounted offers there.

    So how could a person not living in Aguillas (say somebody living in Madrid or Granada) find out about the people who sell the old houses? Is it like a little secret? 🙂

    I perfectly agree that Vera and Garrucha are ugly, Garrucha really stroke with the ugliness.

  • #77857
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    Anonymous
    Participant

    @ralita wrote:

    So how could a person not living in Aguillas (say somebody living in Madrid or Granada) find out about the people who sell the old houses? Is it like a little secret? 🙂

    The problem is market segmentation: people who sell “apartments for tourists” advertise them in big agencies. People who sell houses in the zone I am talking about do not even imagine that a tourist could buy their house. They believe tourists are like aliens who like to spend a lot of money. And they believe their house is low-level. But they do not realize that their style of living in fact is very attractive for rich people living in a fast-pace environment. The problem is that there is nobody straddling between these two types of people.

  • #77660
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @ralita wrote:

    So how could a person not living in Aguillas (say somebody living in Madrid or Granada) find out about the people who sell the old houses? Is it like a little secret? 🙂

    The problem is market segmentation: people who sell “apartments for tourists” advertise them in big agencies. People who sell houses in the zone I am talking about do not even imagine that a tourist could buy their house. They believe tourists are like aliens who like to spend a lot of money. And they believe their house is low-level. But they do not realize that their style of living in fact is very attractive for rich people living in a fast-pace environment. The problem is that there is nobody straddling between these two types of people.

  • #77859
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    farstar wrote:
    ralita wrote:
    So how could a person not living in Aguillas (say somebody living in Madrid or Granada) find out about the people who sell the old houses? Is it like a little secret? 🙂

    The problem is market segmentation: people who sell “apartments for tourists” advertise them in big agencies. People who sell houses in the zone I am talking about do not even imagine that a tourist could buy their house. They believe tourists are like aliens who like to spend a lot of money. And they believe their house is low-level. But they do not realize that their style of living in fact is very attractive for rich people living in a fast-pace environment. The problem is that there is nobody straddling between these two types of people.

    OK, then this is the answer to your question: “May I ask why british people are not flooding those areas? (pros: low prices, traditional lifestyle).”

    If they do not know about those areas, how can they be interested?

    About tourists being like alien with lots of money. I guess that is the same impression about foreigners who want to buy: they have much more money than the locals so we fix a price for locals and one for foreigners, as if it were not the same property.

    Whom do you see standing between the foreigners who do not know and the locals who do not know how to sell?

  • #77661
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    farstar wrote:
    ralita wrote:
    So how could a person not living in Aguillas (say somebody living in Madrid or Granada) find out about the people who sell the old houses? Is it like a little secret? 🙂

    The problem is market segmentation: people who sell “apartments for tourists” advertise them in big agencies. People who sell houses in the zone I am talking about do not even imagine that a tourist could buy their house. They believe tourists are like aliens who like to spend a lot of money. And they believe their house is low-level. But they do not realize that their style of living in fact is very attractive for rich people living in a fast-pace environment. The problem is that there is nobody straddling between these two types of people.

    OK, then this is the answer to your question: “May I ask why british people are not flooding those areas? (pros: low prices, traditional lifestyle).”

    If they do not know about those areas, how can they be interested?

    About tourists being like alien with lots of money. I guess that is the same impression about foreigners who want to buy: they have much more money than the locals so we fix a price for locals and one for foreigners, as if it were not the same property.

    Whom do you see standing between the foreigners who do not know and the locals who do not know how to sell?

  • #77863
    Profile photo of Melosine
    Melosine
    Participant

    farstar
    Over the last couple of years there are many more Brit holidaymakers discovering Aguilas. So the potential is there if you put designs in REA’s windows. Particuarly Las Yuccas area. The cafe bar Gullivars has a large English cliental.
    I am surprised ralita wrote the preference was San Juan de los Terreros because it was more scenic. Why because a golf course is going to be there ? This small village is now another overbuilt manufactured area just for 2nd homers.
    With respect ralita I don’t think you really saw Aguilas at all to form such an opinion.
    From the motorway exit you would only have passed by the latter end of the town and this is an area currently undergoing redevelopement.
    Had you parked in the harbour ,by the castle, and walked some of the streets perhaps partaken of beverage in the Plaza de Espana I guarantee you wouldn’t have bothered to visit SJ de las T.

    Wish you all the best in your proposed venture farstar because there are discerning people who don’t want to live in fantasyland.

  • #77663
    Profile photo of Melosine
    Melosine
    Participant

    farstar
    Over the last couple of years there are many more Brit holidaymakers discovering Aguilas. So the potential is there if you put designs in REA’s windows. Particuarly Las Yuccas area. The cafe bar Gullivars has a large English cliental.
    I am surprised ralita wrote the preference was San Juan de los Terreros because it was more scenic. Why because a golf course is going to be there ? This small village is now another overbuilt manufactured area just for 2nd homers.
    With respect ralita I don’t think you really saw Aguilas at all to form such an opinion.
    From the motorway exit you would only have passed by the latter end of the town and this is an area currently undergoing redevelopement.
    Had you parked in the harbour ,by the castle, and walked some of the streets perhaps partaken of beverage in the Plaza de Espana I guarantee you wouldn’t have bothered to visit SJ de las T.

    Wish you all the best in your proposed venture farstar because there are discerning people who don’t want to live in fantasyland.

  • #77864
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    Melosine wrote:
    farstar
    With respect ralita I don’t think you really saw Aguilas at all to form such an opinion.
    From the motorway exit you would only have passed by the latter end of the town and this is an area currently undergoing redevelopement.
    Had you parked in the harbour ,by the castle, and walked some of the streets perhaps partaken of beverage in the Plaza de Espana I guarantee you wouldn’t have bothered to visit SJ de las T.

    I did park in the harbour, walked some of the streets.

    I think Aguilas is a very nice town, I just liked the surrounding of SJ de las Terreros more.
    As far as I was a tourist in that region, I did not look at it from the point of view of a potential buyer.

    To be honest, the place I liked most in that area was exactly at the boundary between Murcia and Andalucia. There were some secluded beaches with excellent views. I loved that area, hopefully they won’t put developments there.

  • #77664
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    Melosine wrote:
    farstar
    With respect ralita I don’t think you really saw Aguilas at all to form such an opinion.
    From the motorway exit you would only have passed by the latter end of the town and this is an area currently undergoing redevelopement.
    Had you parked in the harbour ,by the castle, and walked some of the streets perhaps partaken of beverage in the Plaza de Espana I guarantee you wouldn’t have bothered to visit SJ de las T.

    I did park in the harbour, walked some of the streets.

    I think Aguilas is a very nice town, I just liked the surrounding of SJ de las Terreros more.
    As far as I was a tourist in that region, I did not look at it from the point of view of a potential buyer.

    To be honest, the place I liked most in that area was exactly at the boundary between Murcia and Andalucia. There were some secluded beaches with excellent views. I loved that area, hopefully they won’t put developments there.

  • #77865
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @ralita wrote:

    @melosine wrote:
    farstar
    With respect ralita I don’t think you really saw Aguilas at all to form such an opinion.
    From the motorway exit you would only have passed by the latter end of the town and this is an area currently undergoing redevelopement.
    Had you parked in the harbour ,by the castle, and walked some of the streets perhaps partaken of beverage in the Plaza de Espana I guarantee you wouldn’t have bothered to visit SJ de las T.

    I did park in the harbour, walked some of the streets.

    I think Aguilas is a very nice town, I just liked the surrounding of SJ de las Terreros more.
    As far as I was a tourist in that region, I did not look at it from the point of view of a potential buyer.

    To be honest, the place I liked most in that area was exactly at the boundary between Murcia and Andalucia. There were some secluded beaches with excellent views. I loved that area, hopefully they won’t put developments there.

    Águilas is exactly between Murcia and Andalucía. I also hope they will not develop in Cabo Cope, the last natural space around Águilas. I think that they are in court right now about this issue.

  • #77665
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @ralita wrote:

    @melosine wrote:
    farstar
    With respect ralita I don’t think you really saw Aguilas at all to form such an opinion.
    From the motorway exit you would only have passed by the latter end of the town and this is an area currently undergoing redevelopement.
    Had you parked in the harbour ,by the castle, and walked some of the streets perhaps partaken of beverage in the Plaza de Espana I guarantee you wouldn’t have bothered to visit SJ de las T.

    I did park in the harbour, walked some of the streets.

    I think Aguilas is a very nice town, I just liked the surrounding of SJ de las Terreros more.
    As far as I was a tourist in that region, I did not look at it from the point of view of a potential buyer.

    To be honest, the place I liked most in that area was exactly at the boundary between Murcia and Andalucia. There were some secluded beaches with excellent views. I loved that area, hopefully they won’t put developments there.

    Águilas is exactly between Murcia and Andalucía. I also hope they will not develop in Cabo Cope, the last natural space around Águilas. I think that they are in court right now about this issue.

  • #77867
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @ralita wrote:

    So how could a person not living in Aguillas (say somebody living in Madrid or Granada) find out about the people who sell the old houses? Is it like a little secret? 🙂

    Do what they do in Greece, go to the local cafes where the locals (especially the men!) hang out, get chatting, ask around and put the word out you’re interested in the locality. It’s surprising how quick this grapevine works. It’s how we found our land, the cafe in the local village was full of goat farmers – waiting for the wife to finish cooking dinner. 😉

    This activity however is out of the realm of most Brits who are new to the whole buying process and are content to stay in the comfort zone of glossy brochures and everything ‘on a plate’, organised viewing trips etc.

    My guess is I think the average Brit. purchaser just wants a villa/townhouse in the sun complete with little garden (or modern appartment) and vastly outnumber those wanting something a bit more traditional. But for sure there is a market there albeit a smaller one.

  • #77667
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @ralita wrote:

    So how could a person not living in Aguillas (say somebody living in Madrid or Granada) find out about the people who sell the old houses? Is it like a little secret? 🙂

    Do what they do in Greece, go to the local cafes where the locals (especially the men!) hang out, get chatting, ask around and put the word out you’re interested in the locality. It’s surprising how quick this grapevine works. It’s how we found our land, the cafe in the local village was full of goat farmers – waiting for the wife to finish cooking dinner. 😉

    This activity however is out of the realm of most Brits who are new to the whole buying process and are content to stay in the comfort zone of glossy brochures and everything ‘on a plate’, organised viewing trips etc.

    My guess is I think the average Brit. purchaser just wants a villa/townhouse in the sun complete with little garden (or modern appartment) and vastly outnumber those wanting something a bit more traditional. But for sure there is a market there albeit a smaller one.

  • #77868
    Profile photo of Melosine
    Melosine
    Participant

    Agree ralita between Calarreona and San Juan there are some stunning bays which for most of the year are inhabited by the mobile home brigade .
    However for us the ambience of Aguilas is the best.
    Fantastic shops and restaurants to suit all pockets.
    As an aside ralita. Want to discover secret Spanish places. Ask.
    Within minutes of seeing Mojacar and Mar Menor areas realised this was not the Spain we wanted to live in so investigated more thoroughly.
    Catch 22 though.
    Resorts like these could end up mini Benidorms very easily if advertised too freely.

  • #77668
    Profile photo of Melosine
    Melosine
    Participant

    Agree ralita between Calarreona and San Juan there are some stunning bays which for most of the year are inhabited by the mobile home brigade .
    However for us the ambience of Aguilas is the best.
    Fantastic shops and restaurants to suit all pockets.
    As an aside ralita. Want to discover secret Spanish places. Ask.
    Within minutes of seeing Mojacar and Mar Menor areas realised this was not the Spain we wanted to live in so investigated more thoroughly.
    Catch 22 though.
    Resorts like these could end up mini Benidorms very easily if advertised too freely.

  • #77869
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    farstar wrote:
    Águilas is exactly between Murcia and Andalucía. I also hope they will not develop in Cabo Cope, the last natural space around Águilas. I think that they are in court right now about this issue.

    Yes, if I remember correctly the secluded beaches were about 5 minutes West of Aguillas, just after Calarreona.

    Is that Cabo Cope?

  • #77669
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    farstar wrote:
    Águilas is exactly between Murcia and Andalucía. I also hope they will not develop in Cabo Cope, the last natural space around Águilas. I think that they are in court right now about this issue.

    Yes, if I remember correctly the secluded beaches were about 5 minutes West of Aguillas, just after Calarreona.

    Is that Cabo Cope?

  • #77870
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @ralita wrote:

    @farstar wrote:
    Águilas is exactly between Murcia and Andalucía. I also hope they will not develop in Cabo Cope, the last natural space around Águilas. I think that they are in court right now about this issue.

    Yes, if I remember correctly the secluded beaches were about 5 minutes West of Aguillas, just after Calarreona.

    Is that Cabo Cope?

    Mmm well, just after Calarreona is also mainly unhabited, and it has gorgeous beaches (my favourites). But it is not a natural park. On the other direction, north east, you have Cabo Cope and Cal Negre, a natural park. It has NO beautiful beaches (it is mainly rocks) and for this reason it has not been urbanized up to now. But it is a natural park with local fauna. Now they want to urbanize it, which has created lots of legal fights (I hope they are not allowed to continue building).

  • #77670
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @ralita wrote:

    @farstar wrote:
    Águilas is exactly between Murcia and Andalucía. I also hope they will not develop in Cabo Cope, the last natural space around Águilas. I think that they are in court right now about this issue.

    Yes, if I remember correctly the secluded beaches were about 5 minutes West of Aguillas, just after Calarreona.

    Is that Cabo Cope?

    Mmm well, just after Calarreona is also mainly unhabited, and it has gorgeous beaches (my favourites). But it is not a natural park. On the other direction, north east, you have Cabo Cope and Cal Negre, a natural park. It has NO beautiful beaches (it is mainly rocks) and for this reason it has not been urbanized up to now. But it is a natural park with local fauna. Now they want to urbanize it, which has created lots of legal fights (I hope they are not allowed to continue building).

  • #77871
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    Melosine wrote:
    Agree ralita between Calarreona and San Juan there are some stunning bays which for most of the year are inhabited by the mobile home brigade .
    However for us the ambience of Aguilas is the best.
    Fantastic shops and restaurants to suit all pockets..

    OK, I aknowledge I could have formed a wrong impression about places. I was associating San Juan with the nice places between Calarreona and San Juan but they can also be associated with Aguillas.

    Need to go again to check in more detail.

  • #77671
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    Melosine wrote:
    Agree ralita between Calarreona and San Juan there are some stunning bays which for most of the year are inhabited by the mobile home brigade .
    However for us the ambience of Aguilas is the best.
    Fantastic shops and restaurants to suit all pockets..

    OK, I aknowledge I could have formed a wrong impression about places. I was associating San Juan with the nice places between Calarreona and San Juan but they can also be associated with Aguillas.

    Need to go again to check in more detail.

  • #77872
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @ralita wrote:

    OK, I aknowledge I could have formed a wrong impression about places. I was associating San Juan with the nice places between Calarreona and San Juan but they can also be associated with Aguillas.

    Need to go again to check in more detail.

    Yes. Even more: those beautiful beaches belong to Águilas, not to Terreros.

  • #77672
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @ralita wrote:

    OK, I aknowledge I could have formed a wrong impression about places. I was associating San Juan with the nice places between Calarreona and San Juan but they can also be associated with Aguillas.

    Need to go again to check in more detail.

    Yes. Even more: those beautiful beaches belong to Águilas, not to Terreros.

  • #77873
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    farstar wrote:
    Mmm well, just after Calarreona is also mainly unhabited, and it has gorgeous beaches (my favourites). But it is not a natural park.

    Is there any property (finca, land, ruin) for sale in that region?

  • #77673
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    farstar wrote:
    Mmm well, just after Calarreona is also mainly unhabited, and it has gorgeous beaches (my favourites). But it is not a natural park.

    Is there any property (finca, land, ruin) for sale in that region?

  • #77874
    Profile photo of Melosine
    Melosine
    Participant

    Agree farstar,
    Fingers crossed all building will stop at Calabardina.
    Cabo Cope is like a breathe of fresh air. Wonderful.
    Have yet to go up the tower and look for pirates though 😉

  • #77674
    Profile photo of Melosine
    Melosine
    Participant

    Agree farstar,
    Fingers crossed all building will stop at Calabardina.
    Cabo Cope is like a breathe of fresh air. Wonderful.
    Have yet to go up the tower and look for pirates though 😉

  • #77875
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @ralita wrote:

    @farstar wrote:

    Mmm well, just after Calarreona is also mainly unhabited, and it has gorgeous beaches (my favourites). But it is not a natural park.

    Is there any property (finca, land, ruin) for sale in that region?

    It is not legal to build in that area, I think. If I can, I would beg to you and to others not to buy illegal constructions built in illegal places. It just makes the place ugly.

  • #77675
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @ralita wrote:

    @farstar wrote:

    Mmm well, just after Calarreona is also mainly unhabited, and it has gorgeous beaches (my favourites). But it is not a natural park.

    Is there any property (finca, land, ruin) for sale in that region?

    It is not legal to build in that area, I think. If I can, I would beg to you and to others not to buy illegal constructions built in illegal places. It just makes the place ugly.

  • #77877
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    farstar wrote:
    ralita wrote:
    farstar wrote:
    Mmm well, just after Calarreona is also mainly unhabited, and it has gorgeous beaches (my favourites). But it is not a natural park.

    Is there any property (finca, land, ruin) for sale in that region?

    It is not legal to build in that area, I think. If I can, I would beg to you and to others not to buy illegal constructions built in illegal places. It just makes the place ugly.

    Thanks God, I am not looking to buy illegal places.

    I was refering to Urbanizacion de Calareona who seem to be a little village…

  • #77677
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    farstar wrote:
    ralita wrote:
    farstar wrote:
    Mmm well, just after Calarreona is also mainly unhabited, and it has gorgeous beaches (my favourites). But it is not a natural park.

    Is there any property (finca, land, ruin) for sale in that region?

    It is not legal to build in that area, I think. If I can, I would beg to you and to others not to buy illegal constructions built in illegal places. It just makes the place ugly.

    Thanks God, I am not looking to buy illegal places.

    I was refering to Urbanizacion de Calareona who seem to be a little village…

  • #77878
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I guess you could find something. But it is very lonely. As Melosine said before, there is nothing like going to Plaza España, or going to the restaurants in the old town, or walking through the harbour or the castle. In Calarreona, you need the car for that.

  • #77678
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I guess you could find something. But it is very lonely. As Melosine said before, there is nothing like going to Plaza España, or going to the restaurants in the old town, or walking through the harbour or the castle. In Calarreona, you need the car for that.

  • #77960
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    hi all…just joined this website and was amazed to see this thread
    we have been looking at Aguilas for the last two years since seeing an old town house property on one of the property websites . I think we’re just the sort of people this kind of development could be aimed at
    specifically we are looking for a 3/4 bed old traditional spanish townhouse in the old part of town with a large roof terrace with sea views and within about 5 minutes walk from the beach ..what sort of prices do these make among the locals ?
    with regards to your original post I think you are on the right lines howver I think it would be a mistake to develop in the style of new build property..if i were to buy a new house in the city I would want it to be as traditonal looking as possible ..for it not to stand out against the older properties there …no reason why it shouldnt be modern inside but it must keep the character of the surroundings externally ..after all thats the reason people would be buying..character and desire to be part of real spain ..
    I know that we could never buy in any of the new developments no matter how cheap they become ..

  • #77760
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    hi all…just joined this website and was amazed to see this thread
    we have been looking at Aguilas for the last two years since seeing an old town house property on one of the property websites . I think we’re just the sort of people this kind of development could be aimed at
    specifically we are looking for a 3/4 bed old traditional spanish townhouse in the old part of town with a large roof terrace with sea views and within about 5 minutes walk from the beach ..what sort of prices do these make among the locals ?
    with regards to your original post I think you are on the right lines howver I think it would be a mistake to develop in the style of new build property..if i were to buy a new house in the city I would want it to be as traditonal looking as possible ..for it not to stand out against the older properties there …no reason why it shouldnt be modern inside but it must keep the character of the surroundings externally ..after all thats the reason people would be buying..character and desire to be part of real spain ..
    I know that we could never buy in any of the new developments no matter how cheap they become ..

  • #78188
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I hope people looking for a home in Águilas will not consider Cabo Cope area. Please help us keeping natural environment. It is our responsibility.

    Rare tortoise threatened as last of Spain’s unspoiled coast falls prey to developers

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/mai…ortoise129.xml

    It has survived wars, disease and famine, but the spread of residential tourism across its natural habitat may prove too much for the spur-thighed tortoise.

    Small populations of Testudo graeca survive in only two small pockets in Spain; the national park of Doñana in Andalusia and a strip of as yet unspoiled coastline between Almeria and Murcia in the southeast.

    But now one of the last remaining stretches of undeveloped coast on the Spanish Mediterranean is falling prey to the same kind of mass construction that has buried the Costa del Sol under a layer of concrete.

    Environmentalists fear a new 5,000 acre development, that promises to be one of the largest purpose built tourist resorts in Europe, heralds the end of the protected species of tortoise.

    “The development will destroy one of the last unspoiled corners of the coastline of the Murcia region – an area of incalculable environmental value – and will endanger the survival of the protected spur-thighed tortoise,” said a statement from environmentalist group Ecologists in Action.

    They are protesting against plans by the regional government to allow the construction of Marina de Cope, a development that when completed will include 9,000 holiday homes, hotel accommodation for 20,000 guests, five golf courses and a 2,000 berth marina.

    Jose Pablo Ruiz Abellán, the regional head of tourism for Murcia, claimed the initiative was a necessary step for the region to become an “international reference point for quality tourism”.

    The project near the town of Águilas controversially encompasses land that forms part of a Natural Park and was protected until the regional government introduced an amendment to allow the construction to go ahead.

    “Taking steps backward in the protection of natural spaces cannot be allowed in any civilized country,” claim organisers of the campaign to Save Cabo de Cope Natural Park.

    Of the threat to the survival of Spain’s tortoises, Ruben Vives, the Murcian regional secretary for Ecologists in Action, told Spain’s El Pais newspaper: “This species’ habitat is very reduced, so its ecological value is huge.

    “The key to their future lies in how much habitable surface they have, and this area keeps shrinking due to land declassifications, new roads, agriculture and so on. So right now, the tendency is for them to disappear.”

    The construction process itself causes great harm to the reptiles with many crushed by the mechanical diggers.

    Even those that survive the process are likely to face further problems. Because they are cold-blooded, slow-moving animals, a road represents a much bigger obstacle to them than to swifter and more robust animals such as deer or boar.

    “When groups become isolated from the main population due to a project that cuts through their terrain, they often simply die out,” said Mr Vives, underscoring that even though the EU Habitats Directive has set aside protected land for them, these areas are insufficient and unconnected.

    This could mark the end of a species that, although not indigenous to Spain, has for centuries made its home here, according to Christian Wiesner, a vet and tortoise specialist who works out of the Mediterranean coast.

    “This area is ideal because they are extremely well adapted to the arid climate, supporting long periods of water deprivation and food scarcity,” said Mr Wiesner.

    “Mediterranean tortoises have already disappeared from most of their original biotopes; almost none are left in France and Italy due to human pressure, and they can only survive in remote and sparsely populated areas. One of these important residual habitats, Águilas, is now about to be destroyed.”

  • #79718
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    We have bought in a village called San Isidro,between Catral & Albatera.
    Friendly,kind locals,no hassle & not a takeaway or fast food for miles.

    This is the real Spain.

    If you want all things British,then locate to Blackpool.

    We can always go to Benidorm for some culture!

  • #79727
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I think there are several issues, that drives many buyers to seek developments

    – the language barrier contributes a lot to an individuals confidence in breaking away from using developers / promoters and exploring their options alone.

    – marketing (also within the UK) backed up by English speaking services (and we’ve all heard where that can lead).

    – lack of knowledge how the process of purchasing, mortgage and taxation works and the ‘legal’ checkpoints that need to be undertaken.

    – the ‘fast food’ mentality; rather than spend plenty of time looking around, getting a taste of living in an area and also any possible works needed to a property, people want it ‘now’.

    IMO, the above contribute to a certain type of purchaser targeting big developments because of their visibility in the market and offering a ‘one stop shop’ that ‘seem’ to address their fears and trepidation.

    These are generalisations and to every generalisation there are many exceptions – I say this to avoid getting ‘flamed’ by individuals that don’t see my observations as applying to them.

    Mike

  • #79731
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator

    Apartments in typically spanish areas = dogs/bikes on balconies, loud music, Strange (and often dodgy) DIY internally. Bit similar to living on a London council estate.

  • #79735
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Hi

    While I totally agree with you Katy on noisy neighbours etc,perhaps we have been very lucky. In our apartments,most neighbours are quiet and courteous. If there is too much noise,El Presidente stops it right away.

    As for the structure of the building itself,the builders (grupo invercon) have excelled themselves in everything of the highest quality. As you can see,we are more than delighted with our ‘bolt hole’ in the sun.

    Some people have been having so much hassle and upset,we can only be thankful our purchase went without a hitch.

    Yes,sometimes the language can be a problem,but nothing that can be sorted eventually. That is our only complaint,but hey, it was our choice to locate to a Spanish village where prices are cheaper,service is better and smiles get you far.

  • #79739
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I have been reading the thread and it seems that some people is interested in Aguilas.

    The best location to buy a house here is Calabardina. My parents have a detached home here and I escape from the city to there at weekends in order to relax.

    I hope people who wants to build in Cabo Cobe are jailed so they wont destroy one of the last free urbanisation enviroments of the Region. Is so nice to walk, run, ride on bicicle, fishing or whatever activity do like here in Cabo Cope.

    For the ones interested I have seem some beautiful detached homes in Calabardina for sale and it may have a lower price during this crisis so it can be a good opportunity to buy something out of the typical british resort product.

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