viewing properties

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This topic contains 37 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Anonymous Anonymous 10 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #52079
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    We will be viewing a number of resale properties whilst we are in Murcia for 3 months. What are the important questions to ask whilst we are
    viewing.

  • #64357
    Profile photo of Melosine
    Melosine
    Participant

    My advice is to let the agent do all the talking and note what is said then if ,and when ,you find a suitable property BEFORE committing instruct an independant lawyer to find out the legality of everything. This can be done very quickly.

    As nice and honest as many agents are they are only interested in their commission . They do not check out beforehand the legality of any property on their registers and have a bad habit of saying what they think you want to hear.

  • #64362
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Don’t let them tempt you into looking at NEW resale properties. Only look at things that have been/are lived in!

  • #64364
    Profile photo of Melosine
    Melosine
    Participant

    I don’t see a problem with new resales. If you desire to be on the coast this is probably your only option
    Not all developers and developments are illegal. To view a broad spectrum is surely the best way. Just take independant legal advice before committing

  • #64366
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    Anonymous
    Participant

    @melosine wrote:

    Not all developers and developments are illegal.


    Did I say they were?

    Just take independant legal advice before committing

    In the present climate..that’s easier said than done. You only have to look on the forum and receive the number of pm’s that I get asking for my lawyers details to see that people do not know how to find that right lawyer to give them the correct information. Too many lawyers prevaricate, depending on the situation from week to week, month to month. JMO.

  • #64369
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @natalie wrote:

    We will be viewing a number of resale properties whilst we are in Murcia for 3 months. What are the important questions to ask whilst we are viewing.

    Ask the agents how much commission they are charging.
    Ask the agents what qualifications they have.
    Ask them to what professional bodies/organisations their business belongs.
    Ask how long they have been in business.
    Ask them if any money you hand over is held in a client bonded account.
    Ask them for sight of the escritura for the property.
    Ask if they’ve verified it’s all legal.

  • #64373
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Good advice from Hilly Billy. I understand that an agent is required by Spanish consumer protection law to declare his/her commission – Royal Decree 218/2005,effective from 7 Feb 2006. Maria de Castro wrote about this on another post- Documento Informativo Abreviado. A further thought. Unless you have building construction experience, I would get the property surveyed by a technically competent and independent professional. A good lawyer should be able to advise here. Good luck and remember not to leave your COMMON SENSE at check-out in the UK. Many people have no problems with the buying process here but, as with any major investment, you need to tread warily and, if you have any doubts,seek clarification/walk away/give yourself time for reflection. This is a lovely country and with a good dose of reality everything will work out fine for you.

    Buena suerte,

    James

  • #64374
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    James wrote.

    Good luck and remember not to leave your COMMON SENSE at check-out in the UK.

    That comment is unnecessary and insulting!

  • #64375
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Hola Claire,

    My comment was in no way meant to be insulting.

    James

  • #64376
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    Anonymous
    Participant

    But James…it is insulting! I do not know why people say it 👿

  • #64377
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Hola Claire,

    Let’s not get wound up about this. But, it’s true. We all get softened up by the sun, the beautiful surroundings etc…! We all have common sense, just sometimes we forget to exercise it. That’s why forums like this are extremely useful.

    James

  • #64379
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Advise my hillybilly is sound. However in practise the agent will say YES to all the questions.
    How does one verify it at that point of time ?

  • #64380
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Shakeel, I was going to say the same but didn’t for fear of needing to put my armour plate on!! 😉

    Personally, I wouldn’t believe an agent if he were to tell me what day of the week it was today, yesterday or tomorrow. 🙁

  • #64381
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Hola Shakeel,

    A good agent should have a copy of the escritura,a Nota Simple(provided by the Property Register) which gives outline details of the property, or both. You can confirm the size of the building by measuring it yourself if you are seriously interested in making an offer. A good local lawyer will know the volume of sales in a given locality which will help you pitch an offer/judge the strength of the market.Other indicators are the number of se vende signs in the area,the tiredness of photographs in the agents windows…etc. If you are buying in an area with a sizeable ex pat community, talk to them. Use this forum to hear what others think about market activity. Look at property sales websites to see what/how much is on offer. The sad reality of present day life is that very few people advise. The great majority of intermediaries are just interested in selling which means buyers have to do much of their own “due diligence”.

    Saludos,

    James

  • #64382
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Hi Claire,

    Claire said

    Don’t let them tempt you into looking at NEW resale properties. Only look at things that have been/are lived in!

    Im sorry Claire but I dont really understand why Natalie should not consider a “new resale” and only choose one that has been lived in.

    Just beacuse it’s lived in does not automatically ensure the house is problem free. And because it has been lived in should Natalie assume that all will be fine?? I dont see a problem with either as long as a good lawyer is used.

    Could you clarify your advice?

    Bernard

  • #64383
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Blawes wrote

    Could you clarify your advice?

    NO.

    I am only speaking from personal experience…as always. No property purchase/sale anywhere is problem free. IMO, to buy a property that has been lived in is more likely to show that it is legal. If it isn’t then it should show up before completion. It’s a better bet than buying brand new. There are many people trying to sell on their properties knowing they have no LFO. Look at Karen Mcwilliams posts. A prime example of what I am talking about!

  • #64390
    Profile photo of Melosine
    Melosine
    Participant

    Please Claire…chill out a little.
    Just because my post followed on from yours doesn’t mean to say I am nit picking on yours or anyone else’s comments.
    Far from it.
    Someone asks a question and I answer without prejudice and expect the same consideration in return .Personal insults for or against are not what this forum is about.
    We are all surely entitled to our opinions many of which we all agree on and highlighting possible concerns is a way of getting a message across..
    This forum is mainly about people with BIG problems from rogue developers. I was simply highlighting the fact that not all are like this because if one wants to buy in a complex or on the coast this is possibly the only option available.

    As for taking Independant advice. Well surely you can see I mean not recommended by agent.
    Whether or not a lawyer is good or bad none of us can say. For one person they they be a Godsend for another a disaster.

    Finally stating that the comment James made about ” leaving common sense at the airport” is insulting is laughable. It is a fact that there are times when we all need to be reminded …we certainly were…..because the thrill and excitement of a new purchase, whatever it may be, sometimes causes people to act irrationally.

  • #64392
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator

    I can understand Claire being cross. what happened to her (and others) was nothing to do with common sense. I have owned property here for 20 years and if I had decided to buy there the same would have happened to me. They were a reputable company (as far as anyone knew) with previous projects, no-one could have forseen how things developed (or didn’t develop!!).

    I know some people get carried away, like the ones on “place in the Sun” who imagine having a gin and tonic on the terrace without noticing the cracks and hand over their money to a dodgy agent but these people are not representative of this site.

    I would be annoyed if someone was insinuating that I had acted a bit daft.

  • #64393
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Hi Natalie,

    Claire said,

    It’s a better bet than buying brand new.

    Im sorry but I dont think that this is valid advice. In my opinion Natalie should look at resale, new and new resale (ones people bought to sell on)and finished ones that a builder has not yet sold to anybody.

    There is no proof that this is true and could in fact mean Natalie could miss out on some good properties. Builders have a lot more flexibility in prices if they want to sell a particular property whereas an existing property owner will not want to lower the price too much. A builder is making a big profit and can easily afford to throw in a few extras.

    My advice to Natilie is to view all types of property. Have a fully independent lawyer ready in advance. Any questions to the existing owners (for resales) should be just general questions. Leave any important questions about deeds, charges etc to the lawyer and not the owner, agent or builder.

  • #64394
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Hombres,

    Can see I have set the cat amongst the pigeons! My remark this morning that people should not leave their common sense at the check-out desk was not PERSONAL to anyone on this forum. However, the simple fact is that many people do get swept along by the excitement of buying abroad. I have worked in property all my life and have experience of restoring houses in France and Spain, so have come across most situations.

    However, if the whole system is working against your interests -agent,lawyerand developer- you would need to have acutely developed senses of self preservation to prevent yourself being conned. Very few of us are that finely tuned so I can well understand the rage of those who have fallen foul of the unacceptable business practices of those in the real estate game on the CDS, and elsewhere in Spain/Bulgaria etc..

    When I worked as a chartered surveyor we ADVISED our clients. Sometimes the advice was “DONT BUY”.One of the biggest problems for people buying overseas is the lack of independent advice. Everyone wants to sell. This forum has been a godsend for many but just think of the thousands of people who are unaware of this type of on-line community.

    Saludos,

    James

  • #64395
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Thank you so much for all your valuable advice. I am going to keep all the revelant replies and take them with me.

    No I wasn’t insulted by the remarks, and will certainly have my wits about me when we find a property we like.

    We are not really interested in a new property, looking for something a bit more established where all the facilities, infrastructure, etc. are in place.

    Estate Agents beware I will be asking lots and lots of questions thanks to all of you.

  • #64396
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Natalie,

    Good luck with your search. A final piece of practical advice. If you are buying an old property to restore or looking to add a heating installation to an existing building try and find out what “potencia” ( current) is available in the electricity cable supplying your house. I have 25kw for my house. In France EDF just opgraded the meter but in many of the smaller towns in Spain the infrasructure is lacking. At the end of my project I had to pay an extra 10,000€ for a new cable which was then ceded back to Endesa and which I then had to pay to connect to!. I was told this was illegal but as they have an office block full of abogados I decided it was better to cough up and move on. This also happened to two Spanish friends of mine here one of whom received a very nasty bill.

    James

  • #64421
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Go on Claire live dangerously !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I allways speak my mind and expect people to take it in a grown up manner. As the world outside the comfort of our loved ones is not a nice place,

    Guess what I get attacked from all directions.

  • #64422
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @shakeel wrote:

    Go on Claire live dangerously !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I think Claire has had a gut-full of ‘living dangerously’ Shakeel, having just come through years of dreadful stress with a developer that has behaved in a disgraceful manner (nothing short of bribery, lies, deceit and theft), culminating in a court case.

    She now doesn’t need to come on this forum anymore for help, support and advice. It is now over for her. But she does, but it is now to offer her opinion like everyone else with the sole motivation of trying to help.
    On our development alone, she organised help for over 14 people, many of whom would have been financially ruined if it was not for her.

    And do you know what her motivation is? She can’t bear others to go through what she has gone through. And yes, she is paranoid (as I am) about new developments – I for one, until these 30,000 illegal builds are sorted out, would not recommend a new build. That is just our opinion. Of course, we know not all new builds have problems, but it is a hell of a minefield out there knowing which ones are safe to go for.

    We get pm’s all the time from people with heartbreaking stories, where their lifesavings are in jeopardy with these problem developments. And have been told of one poor person who not only had a nervous breakdown with the stress but ended up committing suicide (that was an AIFOS client).

    In these difficult days on the CDS, any warnings should be listened to, but of course it is up to the individual in the end to make their own decisions.

    Barbara

  • #64426
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @hillybilly wrote:

    Ask the agents how much commission they are charging.
    Ask the agents what qualifications they have.
    Ask them to what professional bodies/organisations their business belongs.
    Ask how long they have been in business.
    Ask them if any money you hand over is held in a client bonded account.
    Ask them for sight of the escritura for the property.
    Ask if they’ve verified it’s all legal.

    @shakeel wrote:

    in practise the agent will say YES to all the questions.
    How does one verify it at that point of time ?

    You can ask to be shown the sales agreement that the agent should have with the vendor, showing the price the vendor will get and the commission agreed. In practice many agents only seem to have verbal arrangements with vendors though. Avoid these ones.

    Ask to see evidence of their qualifications. If they say they belong to some professional body, get their membership number and check them out direct with the organisation. I found out an estate agent purporting to be an overseas member of the NAEA in fact wasn’t.

    You can check when a business was registered at the Spanish equivalent of companies house, the details of whcih escape me at present and you can check the directors’ names etc online for free too.

    Ask for evidence re a bonded account and ask to physically see the escritura and any notes they have on file too.

    If an agent is reputable they should have no problem disclosing any of this info. If they can’t or won’t, walk away. IMHO many 1st time buyers here are far too trusting, expecting estate agents in Spain to be like those in the UK (who are bad enough!) and far too reticent about asking up front questions. I know I was first time around!

    Shouldn’t be nasty about UK estate agents though – mine have just sold a house for me within 48hrs of going on the market at more than the asking price and have been v professional throughout! Guess I got lucky!

  • #64429
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Well said Shakeel. An agent who will not reveal his commission, does not provide factual information about a property …etc should not be trusted. It would be interesting to start up an on-line survey of what buyers feel is a fair commission. It is repeated ad nauseam by the agents that 5% is the norm. Of course you have to add 16% IVA to this making a total of 5.8%! The fact is that there are no officially set commission rates. As users of this forum know all too well there are many cases of commissions hugely in excess of this being charged. When you consider that overheads in Spain (particularly rent and salaries) are significantly lower than in the UK, even a commission of 5% plus IVA is outrageously high. If agents in the UK can survive on 1.00/2.5% plus VAT of 17.5%, surely they can do it here? I fully accept there is a case for a minimum fee in the case of “low value” properties but as prices in many parts of coastal Spain START at 150,000€, the commission structure is completely unjustified. Let’s say you buy a house here for 300,000€/ £200,000 the commission at 5% would be 15,000€ plus IVA, a total of 17,400€/£11,800. In the UK the agent’s fee would be between 3400€/ £2350 and 8600€/£5875. A substantial difference. Anyone got any views on this?

    James

  • #64431
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Well, the UK agent I mentioned above sold my house for commission of 1.25%. Another agent was offering to sell it for 1%. To my mind estate agents in the UK are better qualified (usually) than those here (esp the expat ones who operate out of a car and/or bar) and work harder for their money (valuing properly, measuring up, preparing detailed details!). I know the distances involved here may be greater but that’s the same for all of us and ditto re competition.
    I perform the same work here as I used to in the UK and charge about 1/2 or at most 2/3 what I used to be able to charge in the UK. And sometimes I have a 3 hour drive!
    I think a cap on commission should be about 3% with maybe a minimum chargeable fee (on lower value properties) of say, €3000.

  • #64433
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    Anonymous
    Participant

    Hola Hilly Billy,

    I am pretty much in agreement with what you say. I have been in property all my life,23 years of which as a Chartered Surveyor, so I know what constitutes good practice.

    James

  • #64436
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator

    Bear in mind that the employees are commission only so they don’t have to pay staff wages if now sales. A friends son worked for one agent for over 2 months and didn’t sell anything…so no wages.

    I think around 3% would be reasonable, did you see my post re. commissions?

    The agents are so badly organised too, if you were taking a client to see houses at around a milion euros wouldn’t you do your homework before the appointment? at least have a map and not get lost.

  • #64437
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Katy,

    I know of someone who worked for one of the big agents on a commission basis but wasn’t paid his commission until someone with influence had a word!

    James

  • #64439
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I didn’t know that the commision was so high. As we will be in spain for quite some time is it worth looking at private sales,do they exist?

    If I employ a good lawyer do I need an estate agent if I find a private sale.?

    Sorry if I don’t sound very clued up – this is the first time buying property in Spain.

    Natalie.

  • #64440
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    Anonymous
    Participant

    sorry of course they exist just found them on this site. Will now have a look through them. Natalie.

  • #64441
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    Anonymous
    Participant

    Natalie,

    For private sales look in the local English language press in your chosen area of Spain. Also look in the UK press, Sunday Times, London Evening Standard etc.Also check out the internet. A good lawyer is absolutely essential. If you find a private sale YOU DO NOT NEED an agent! However,you might go and look at comparable properties with one to get a feel for the market. With the knowledge gleaned from this forum you have no reason to fear agents! You will go on your trip with an excellent knowledge of how they work.If you find a property through an agent make sure to get a split of the price between their commission and the “bricks and mortar”. Happy hunting.

    James

  • #64462
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Hi,

    Can I recommend David Hampshires Buying a home in Spain series of books, they are updated yearly and seemed very useful when we were in the process of thinking about buying here, although there were some gaps too, buy these could be regional things.

    Advice for buying a resale property I guess is dependant on whether you are looking for an older village property for renovation or a “newer” property on a development. Although the use a lawyer, surveyor etc etc independant of the estate agent applies to both.

    Mark wrote a good article about buying a country property and the possible problems last year, I think you can still find it on the main body of the website, but the main problem is making sure the property has the correct title deeds and the person selling it actually owns it and that utilities are connected.

    Good luck
    Heather

  • #65227
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    one bit of advice i like to give is this:

    Take a video camera and film everything!!!!

    The lies we caught on camera from unscrupulous agents were astounding!!!, but we were lucky or whatever and looked elsewhere.
    Had this not been the case, the tapes may have come in useful at possible later court actions. Somewhat harder to deny the lies or call them a misunderstanding when they are on film!

  • #65234
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Hi Natalie

    I have written a couple of articles that may be of interest including advice on how to find a property without an agent (entitled “to use an agent or not”). I have also written a guide to buying a property in Spain, which is 30 pages giving fairly comprehensive step by step instructions, the pitfalls and how to avoid them and how to save money – including how to negotitate a better deal. If you would like these then drop me a PM and I will send them to you – they are free of charge.

    The offer is open to anyone.

    Best wishes

    Vince

  • #65239
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Thanks for the offer of information vince, wish I had known earlier but I am now packing to go next week for 3 months. Have booked two places in the Murcia area plus hire car so we will have plenty of time and opportunity to look for our dream home.

    Thank you all so much for the advice. Will let you know the outcome
    when I return in December.

  • #65257
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Natalie

    one last piece of advice before you go off to Spain searching for your new home.

    The Junta of Andalucia has passed a new regulation back in October 2005 obliging all estate agents to produce to perspective buyers a dossier which is called ‘abbreviated information documents’ (documentos informativos abreviados). Please note that the same applies in the whole of Spain.

    These documents should give an exhaustive(detailed) description of all the information relating to the house and the financial terms of the offer.

    This dossier/document must include the following:

    Information on
    – the estate agent, the developer or the building company
    – the phases of works
    – architectural plans of the house and its position
    -its utilised surface (superficie util)
    – the quality of materials used and the description of its services
    -the sale price with any other related costs and
    -form of payment
    -any debts/mortgages against the property
    -type of sale
    -building licence or the Registration of the property (Nota Simple) from the Land Registry

    With reference to the last item please ensure that before you commit yourself to paying any deposits (even a holding deposit) that you do a search with the Local Town Planning office that the particular Building Licence is fine and has no court cases against it!!!

    If you do not speak Spanish then employ a solicitor to carry out this search for you. And DON’T hire a lawyer recommended to you by the estate agent or the developer. Your best bet would be to walk into the local cafe and ask the locals for a solicitor!!!

    Best of luck in your house hunting!!!

    Katerina

    PS. The relevant article in Spanish is:

    LAS INMOBILIARIAS ESTARÁN OBLIGADAS A ENTREGAR A COMPRADORES Y ARRENDADORES UN DOCUMENTO CON DATOS EXHAUSTIVOS DE LA VIVIENDA
    El nuevo reglamento de información para la compraventa y alquiler aumenta las garantías de protección al consumidor
    Los promotores, intermediarios y arrendatarios de viviendas deberán poner a disposición del público un documento informativo que recoja de forma exhaustiva los datos del inmueble y las condiciones económicas de la oferta. Así se recoge en el reglamento aprobado hoy por el Consejo de Gobierno sobre información al consumidor en la compraventa y alquiler de viviendas.

    Respecto a la normativa estatal que actualmente se aplica, el decreto autonómico introduce como principal novedad la obligatoriedad de entregar a los clientes, de forma gratuita, los llamados Documentos Informativos Abreviados (en el caso de primeras ventas y alquileres) y las fichas informativas (para el mercado de segunda mano). En estos documentos se incluyen los datos fundamentales sobre el inmueble y su financiación.

    La norma, que refuerza las garantías de protección para compradores e inquilinos, prohíbe expresamente silenciar esos datos, así como proporcionar información que pueda inducir a error al comprador.

    El Documento Informativo Abreviado deberá incluir información sobre el intermediario, proyectista o empresa constructora, la fase de ejecución de la obra, el plano de la vivienda y su situación, su superficie útil, la calidad de los materiales y la descripción de sus servicios, así como el precio de venta junto con los gastos y la forma de pago. También se detallarán las cargas que puedan pesar sobre el inmueble y, en función del tipo de venta, se añadirán otros datos legales como la licencia de obras o los datos de inscripción en el Registro de la Propiedad.
    Además, se informará al consumidor de que puede pedir una nota informativa sobre la forma de pago con todas las condiciones económicas, incluyendo las relativas a la oferta hipotecaria que se le propone y el tipo de interés aplicable en caso de aplazamientos del precio. Una vez alcanzado el acuerdo de compraventa, la empresa hará llegar al comprador, al menos tres días hábiles antes de la firma, todos los documentos reflejados en el Documento Informativo Abreviado, así como los seguros y licencias del inmueble.

    En el caso específico del arrendamiento, el documento recogerá los siguientes datos: identificación del arrendador y del intermediario en su caso, descripción de la vivienda y de los servicios con los que cuenta, superficie útil, condiciones económicas e inventario de enseres y mobiliario.

    Segunda mano
    El decreto también aborda los requisitos de información para la venta de viviendas de segunda mano, un ámbito hasta ahora escasamente regulado. La obligación se concreta en la entrega al cliente de una ficha informativa de datos básicos entre los que deben figurar la dirección del inmueble, su descripción general y la del edificio en que se ubica, el año de construcción, el precio de venta, los gastos que conlleva y la forma de pago, así como las referencias de la nota informativa simple (propietario, metros útiles y cargas).

    De igual modo, el vendedor indicará que cuenta con un certificado de que la vivienda está al corriente en el pago del IBI y si hay otros datos que se puedan facilitar al posible comprador. También se debe reflejar en la ficha, con letras destacadas, si se establece un plazo que vincula al comprador con la inmobiliaria en tanto se gestiona la compraventa.

    Finalmente, en lo referido a la publicidad, la norma establece el carácter vinculante para los datos y condiciones que se reflejen sobre ofertas y promociones, de tal modo que el consumidor podrá exigir su cumplimiento aunque no figuren expresamente en el contrato de compraventa o alquiler.
    La publicidad deberá especificar la situación del inmueble, su descripción y superficie útil, la fase de construcción en que se encuentra y los datos del promotor, además de informar del derecho del consumidor a que se le entregue el Documento Informativo Abreviado. Cuando se refleje el precio de venta o arrendamiento se incluirán los gastos que conlleva la operación (tributos o comunidad) y en caso de que se exijan cantidades a cuenta se indicará que estarán avaladas por una entidad bancaria.

    En el capítulo sancionador, y dependiendo del distinto nivel de gravedad, el decreto establece multas de entre 200 euros y 400.000 euros para las infracciones contra las disposiciones recogidas en el mismo.

    La deficiente información en el ámbito de la compraventa y alquiler de viviendas constituyen la cuarta causa de reclamaciones de los ciudadanos andaluces dentro del sector servicios. Entre enero y septiembre de este año, los servicios de protección al consumidor de la Junta registraron un total de 998 reclamaciones, si bien esta cifra supuso un descenso del 29% respecto al mismo periodo de 2004.

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