The Spanish Armada may reduce Dole Queues!

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This topic contains 13 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Anonymous Anonymous 3 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #57627
    Profile photo of angie
    angie
    Spectator

    As Spanish brains leave Spain to find work abroad, theoretically this could reduce the huge Spanish unemployment figures but at what cost? This article reckons 150,000 Spaniards now live in the UK alone, so how many live elsewhere? 🙄

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/euro … s-way.html

  • #113183
    Profile photo of GarySFBCN
    GarySFBCN
    Participant

    This is exactly what Merkel ordered:

    Angela Merkel’s advice for Europe’s unemployed: move

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/germany/10121014/Angela-Merkels-advice-for-Europes-unemployed-move.html

    And it provides us with yet another example why politicians should never be allowed to have anything to do with finances.

    If Europe ever exits this financial crisis, someday, while looking back, we will see the true devastation of the ‘mindless austerity’ policy, including the destruction of cultures, countries, the migration of entire populations, and because of that migration, the further exploitation of vulnerable workers that results in even greater concentrations of wealth in the wealthy, and increased despair among those who are not wealthy.

    It’s as if we are living in a Dickens novel.

  • #113956
    Profile photo of DBMarcos99
    DBMarcos99
    Participant

    Much as I admire the Spanish attitude at conquering world markets (think Iniditex, Gowex, Santander or construction companies), I’m beginning to tire very quickly of the whinge “poor us, we have to go to Germany or London to find our first job, and it may be a job that we are over-qualified to do…”
    There were millions of Poles who went abroad to work (and before them Indians, West Indians, Irish and yes, even Brits) who have done this. I haven’t always got on well with Polish people (I suppose they are a little like Brits – some are hospitable, others not so much) but I never heard them whinge once about having to work outside their home country.

  • #113986
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @dbmarcos99 wrote:

    Much as I admire the Spanish attitude at conquering world markets (think Iniditex, Gowex, Santander or construction companies), I’m beginning to tire very quickly of the whinge “poor us, we have to go to Germany or London to find our first job, and it may be a job that we are over-qualified to do…”
    There were millions of Poles who went abroad to work (and before them Indians, West Indians, Irish and yes, even Brits) who have done this. I haven’t always got on well with Polish people (I suppose they are a little like Brits – some are hospitable, others not so much) but I never heard them whinge once about having to work outside their home country.

    The didnt whinge because they were glad to escape from Poland.

  • #114026
    Profile photo of GarySFBCN
    GarySFBCN
    Participant

    Much as I admire the Spanish attitude at conquering world markets (think Iniditex, Gowex, Santander or construction companies), I’m beginning to tire very quickly of the whinge “poor us, we have to go to Germany or London to find our first job, and it may be a job that we are over-qualified to do…”

    Well now, that is incredibily insensitive, isn’t it? Having to leave one’s homeland just to be able to eat is not pleasant and can be very traumatic. Families are being torn apart but it isn’t as bad as the Poles, so it’s not bad now, is it? And the Poles had it better than the Jews, and the Jews better than the Chinese and Indians, and the Chinese and Indians had it better than…

    My brother-in-law had to leave his wife and two children to go to France to earn enough money just to pay his mortgage. He doesn’t complain but your smarmy post demonstrates the empathy of a sociopath.

  • #114072
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I left my homeland to seek my fortune elsewhere and I think I’m probably a more rounded person because of it. We should be grateful that the world we live in allows us the opportunity to travel around a bit should we wish to, or perhaps because we have to.

    Or does migration benefit the country left behind? If we look at the recent Indian and Chinese examples, there might be some truth in it, those countries are now at the top of the pile.

    And Poland isn’t doing too badly either, despite the millions who left to work elsewhere.

  • #114180
    Profile photo of DBMarcos99
    DBMarcos99
    Participant

    @Rocker wrote:

    I left my homeland to seek my fortune elsewhere and I think I’m probably a more rounded person because of it. We should be grateful that the world we live in allows us the opportunity to travel around a bit should we wish to, or perhaps because we have to.

    Or does migration benefit the country left behind? If we look at the recent Indian and Chinese examples, there might be some truth in it, those countries are now at the top of the pile.

    And Poland isn’t doing too badly either, despite the millions who left to work elsewhere.

    Well exactly.

    It may not be ideal, but to find work now you often either have to move to get it, or compete against everyone on the web. Relying on increased trade or tourism just because it was successful in the past, will not work – you have to work to get the increased numbers of Russians, or get even more footfall in the fashion stores. I happen to believe that the Spanish will rise to the challenge – mainly because they have to.

    The truth is we are operating in a global market – and the skills learnt by Spanish abroad, if only language ones and networking, will enable Spanish companies in future to compete on that global market. Indeed they are already doing – here’s a video with a lot of optimism – exports grew 18% in April compared with the previous year.

    http://www.rtve.es/alacarta/videos/telediario/exportaciones-crecieron-18-abril/1886551/

  • #114256
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    That is totally true. The only downside to this kind of movement in welfare states is that albeit unemployed skilled workers may move the country may still be attractive for big influx of refugees and people from countries even worse off. Making the positive effects less effective.

  • #114303
    Profile photo of Chopera
    Chopera
    Participant

    @garysfbcn wrote:

    Much as I admire the Spanish attitude at conquering world markets (think Iniditex, Gowex, Santander or construction companies), I’m beginning to tire very quickly of the whinge “poor us, we have to go to Germany or London to find our first job, and it may be a job that we are over-qualified to do…”

    Well now, that is incredibily insensitive, isn’t it? Having to leave one’s homeland just to be able to eat is not pleasant and can be very traumatic. Families are being torn apart but it isn’t as bad as the Poles, so it’s not bad now, is it? And the Poles had it better than the Jews, and the Jews better than the Chinese and Indians, and the Chinese and Indians had it better than…

    My brother-in-law had to leave his wife and two children to go to France to earn enough money just to pay his mortgage. He doesn’t complain but your smarmy post demonstrates the empathy of a sociopath.

    I think the point is that it is rather hypocritical of the Spanish to complain, when they have previously benefited from cheap immigrants from Africa, China, South America and Eastern Europe working (and often being exploited) on building sites, in bars, cleaning Spanish people’s homes, etc. I’ve met a few Spaniards who often bragged about how all this immigration was going to for pay their pensions, as well as keep everything cheap. As if they had suddenly become the masters and the immigrants as their servants.

  • #114309
    Profile photo of GarySFBCN
    GarySFBCN
    Participant

    I think the point is that it is rather hypocritical of the Spanish to complain, when they have previously benefited from cheap immigrants from Africa, China, South America and Eastern Europe working (and often being exploited) on building sites, in bars, cleaning Spanish people’s homes, etc. I’ve met a few Spaniards who often bragged about how all this immigration was going to for pay their pensions, as well as keep everything cheap. As if they had suddenly become the masters and the immigrants as their servants.

    ‘The Spanish’ didn’t do that. Individual Spaniards did, it it was hardly the majority of Spaniards.

    Regardless, being forced to leave one’s homeland just to have enough money to eat is not the same as leaving home to make one’s fortune.

    I’m shocked by the lack of empathy here and also a lack of insight into the long-term effects of this, which have been well stated by Edward Hugh.

  • #114393
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I am all in favour of people moving around the global village with a view to look for employment,business,education CV development etc, as a matter of choice and do not see this an issue. What I do not favour is where the people are forced to take this step due to failure of their respective Governments. This could be due to lack of vision by the government , not being aware of the future need of human resources in the evolving economy and the sector of the economy that will absorb these people.

    The truth here is that Spaniards are comfortable in living with their parents, happily ask for money from parents for going out, do not contribute to their boarding and lodging. They are in a comfort zone and do not like to be taken out of it. Their views of being forced to leave their country for seeking employment as some kind of punishment is typical & shows lack maturity & not smelling the “cafe con leche” .

  • #114396
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    This being an English-speaking Spanish property forum, it is bound to be peopled by commentators who have left their homelands at some stage to live and work abroad, or are actively considering such a move.

    As English speakers we are unlikely to have moved to Spain because of poverty or lack of opportunity back home, because we come from comparatively wealthy countries, but the majority of incomers to Spain will have come from poorer countries, from Eastern Europe or South America, or Northern Africa.

    For many reasons Spain has sunk deeply into recession over the past five years, with no immediate end in sight, and young Spanish people are now emigrating in vast numbers to find work in countries where there is employment for them, countries like Germany and the UK.

    This mass movement of people is not new, and there is no need to delve too far into history because it gets complicated, but Turkish people moved to Germany, and Jamaican people to the UK, purely to find work.

    A curious side effect is that a lot of them stayed on and built their lives in their new countries. The same could happen to Spanish people who are on the move now.

    (To return to Spanish property, if the country is emptied of its own nationals and immigrants from poorer countries return home, who on earth is going to buy all the empty houses?)

  • #114876
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @Rocker, That is point. Why should ther Spanish the Spanish people feel that they are hard done by because they have to move.

    Their move to a Germany/UK is only a couple hours flight away and can regularly visit home with low cost airlines etc.. The Jamaicans, Indians, Chinese are thousands of miles away & you do not hear them taking this issue up.

  • #114982
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    The main difficulty, apart from moving away from friends and family, is the need to learn a foreign language. As far as I know, the Spanish education system doesn’t actively encourage such learning, in parts of the province I live in they are still forced to learn a ‘dead’ language, Valenciano. Just a bit further north, it’s Catalan. Neither will help them if they move abroad.

    And the closer your family life, the more difficult it becomes to leave them behind.

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