Not just the Brits with mega problems.

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Anonymous Anonymous 9 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #52894
    Profile photo of Melosine
    Melosine
    Participant

    Recently in my area officials from Regional Government visited and measured the plots of 20 + local Spaniards. All who whom live off a main road.
    Apparently these legally built dwellings are on or too close to pathways (part of which is now a tarmaced main road) which were once used, in ancient times, as access for the movement of livestock and has since become defunct.
    5m from the road is insufficient.Ancient law states pathways must 16m in width.
    A visit to the townhall resulted them in being told they should have checked before building their properties.
    As the books on these ancient laws are only available to townhall officials how could anyone have checked ?
    The tarmaced road will not be widened but owners will have to demolish and resite their boundries etc for a 5 metre verge and it is going to cost them 1,000’s of euros.
    One property is under threat of demolition.
    Anyone heard of this before or does Drakan or Maria know what, if any, action can be taken

  • #72198
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    The question that springs to mind is this. If the Town Halls did their jobs properly, why was this kind of problem not addressed BEFORE the buildings were put up…NOT AFTERWARDS ❓ ❗ ❗ So typical. 🙄

  • #72199
    Profile photo of Melosine
    Melosine
    Participant

    Precisely.
    Local townhall has stated not their problem 😯
    Passing the buck is fast becoming another national sport.

  • #72203
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @melosine wrote:

    Ancient law states pathways must be 16m in width

    I find these ancient laws interesting. In Greece in ‘days of old’, farmers allowed each other to have ‘donkey track’ access along the perimeter of their fields. Today, where people are now building but need wider access, these donkey tracks must become registered (with the various owners’ permissions of course) to become a minimum 4 metre wide ‘Agricultural Road’. Some of the original donkey tracks I’ve seen are only about 2 metres wide. Maybe the Greek donkeys/goats were slimmer than the Spanish ones (!) – 16 metres for an animal pathway is a big chunk of land.

    I’ll give the Greeks their due though. All these ancient ‘donkey tracks’ are readily available for anyone’s lawyer to dig up.
    Apologies for going off topic a bit Melosine, but it’s interesting – am wondering if the 16 metres was ancient-hindsight for the future dual carriageways of today.

  • #72205
    Profile photo of Melosine
    Melosine
    Participant

    Here it’s goats,but even they are a rarity, and certainly keep well away from roads, so much campo, but possibly because tarmac is not good grazing fodder. But they do spread themselves out though.
    This law is over 300 years old but was never amended and now people who want to be powerful are dragging it up. Wonder how many more ancient rulings are just waiting to surprise us.

  • #72216
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    This sounds very much like the ancient “Cattle tracks” that are being resurrected by the Medio Ambiente here in Malaga area.

    We are on one of them and cannot put any permanent boundary between ourselves and the track. The track itself is only 3 metres or so wide, but the Medio Ambiente say its total width should include the land each side of the track for 9 metres. 9 metres takes it up to the paved pathway which skirts the outside of our house.

    The land in question, which we bought properly and is registered in our names in the land registry is now claimed by the Medio Ambiente of the Junta de Andalucia.

    There is a link here to a website where the people concerned are petitioning the EU.

    http://www.survivethefuture.net/CattleTracksAbuse.htm

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