Has the gain in Spain gone down the drain?

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This topic contains 18 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Anonymous Anonymous 8 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #54098
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    Anonymous
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  • #84517
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    katy
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  • #84662
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    katy
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  • #84526
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    mike
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    @KevynDee wrote:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7463741.stm

    Brenda moved to Spain after being made redundant, thinking it would be “a good idea”.

    Because?

  • #84668
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    mike
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    @KevynDee wrote:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7463741.stm

    Brenda moved to Spain after being made redundant, thinking it would be “a good idea”.

    Because?

  • #84532
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    Anonymous
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    …because the two week holiday on the Costa del Sol, with endless sunshine, change of scenery, etc., convinced her this was a good idea. No thought, no strategy, no forward thinking…i.e. let’s do it on a whim, live for today and we’ll be sorted!!!

    Not!

  • #84672
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    Anonymous
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    …because the two week holiday on the Costa del Sol, with endless sunshine, change of scenery, etc., convinced her this was a good idea. No thought, no strategy, no forward thinking…i.e. let’s do it on a whim, live for today and we’ll be sorted!!!

    Not!

  • #84541
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    Anonymous
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    @katy wrote:

    Good article from mark in the Times yesterday.

    http://www.property.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/property/overseas/article4172487.ece

    Don’t think it was one of his best!

  • #84680
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    Anonymous
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    @katy wrote:

    Good article from mark in the Times yesterday.

    http://www.property.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/property/overseas/article4172487.ece

    Don’t think it was one of his best!

  • #84543
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    Anonymous
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    Good article in the times but what I don’t understand is why everyone seems to expect the market to pick up in a few years, I just don’t see it happening in Spain I know it will always be an attractive place to live or have a holiday home but I can’t see the market ever being the same again, property prices here in spain have been fuelled by a massive influx of overseas investment which you will not see again, I think I read somewhere brits accounted for 52% of foreign investment in spanish property.

    I just can’t see it recovering !

  • #84682
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    Anonymous
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    Good article in the times but what I don’t understand is why everyone seems to expect the market to pick up in a few years, I just don’t see it happening in Spain I know it will always be an attractive place to live or have a holiday home but I can’t see the market ever being the same again, property prices here in spain have been fuelled by a massive influx of overseas investment which you will not see again, I think I read somewhere brits accounted for 52% of foreign investment in spanish property.

    I just can’t see it recovering !

  • #84545
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    Anonymous
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    ronniedisco

    i guess those assumptions are based on history mainly, but i think you might be right. Those not put of by falling prices will still probably be put of by the corruption/lpoor planning and land grab issues.

    i think if Spain is to recover, it will need a massive PR exercise to restore confidence, demolish many unwanted/unfinished buildings and It will also need to show that regulation is going to be much stricter at every level and brown envelopes are a thing of the past

    i’m just not sure Spain is ready, or would even want to go very far down that road?

  • #84684
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    Anonymous
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    ronniedisco

    i guess those assumptions are based on history mainly, but i think you might be right. Those not put of by falling prices will still probably be put of by the corruption/lpoor planning and land grab issues.

    i think if Spain is to recover, it will need a massive PR exercise to restore confidence, demolish many unwanted/unfinished buildings and It will also need to show that regulation is going to be much stricter at every level and brown envelopes are a thing of the past

    i’m just not sure Spain is ready, or would even want to go very far down that road?

  • #84549
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    Anonymous
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    I am not sure why Mark just does not tell people to avoid buying in Spain!!

    There is nothing to be bought now that cannot be bought for less in 1-2 year time.

  • #84688
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    Anonymous
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    I am not sure why Mark just does not tell people to avoid buying in Spain!!

    There is nothing to be bought now that cannot be bought for less in 1-2 year time.

  • #84557
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    flosmichael wrote:
    I am not sure why Mark just does not tell people to avoid buying in Spain!!

    There is nothing to be bought now that cannot be bought for less in 1-2 year time.

    For those looking to offload their homes in this region, the strong euro means that owners are having to cut asking prices by at least 15% to attract British buyers, says Mick Roscoe, of The Property Shop in Quesada, about five miles from Torrevieja.

    “Lots of estate agents have gone out of business. Sales volumes are about the same as last year, but it tends to be cheaper properties that sell and we’re having to work harder to get customers.

    “It’s a good time to buy if you have got the money but the banks are really tightening up on loans.”

    Other than”Lots of estate agents have gone out of business” and”Banks are really tightening up on loans” can find nothing else I agree with in the statements made by Mr Roscoe. I would say that it is necessary to drop 25%+ to find any interest. I doubt very much that sales volumes are about the same as last year and now is cerainly not a “good time to buy”.

    As another poster has said why do agents lie continually.

  • #84696
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    Anonymous
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    flosmichael wrote:
    I am not sure why Mark just does not tell people to avoid buying in Spain!!

    There is nothing to be bought now that cannot be bought for less in 1-2 year time.

    For those looking to offload their homes in this region, the strong euro means that owners are having to cut asking prices by at least 15% to attract British buyers, says Mick Roscoe, of The Property Shop in Quesada, about five miles from Torrevieja.

    “Lots of estate agents have gone out of business. Sales volumes are about the same as last year, but it tends to be cheaper properties that sell and we’re having to work harder to get customers.

    “It’s a good time to buy if you have got the money but the banks are really tightening up on loans.”

    Other than”Lots of estate agents have gone out of business” and”Banks are really tightening up on loans” can find nothing else I agree with in the statements made by Mr Roscoe. I would say that it is necessary to drop 25%+ to find any interest. I doubt very much that sales volumes are about the same as last year and now is cerainly not a “good time to buy”.

    As another poster has said why do agents lie continually.

  • #84569
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    Anonymous
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    The reason I did not think it was on of his best articles is that Mark continues not to factor in the exchange rate. I bought my property around 18 months ago and sure it has fallen around 8% according to recent sales, but I bought euros at 1.50 then so my property would cost me in real terms a lot more today, and I am sure that a lot of other people are in the same position. As for the future who knows where the £/Euro will be, up or down? I for one have no regrets (at the moment) about buying when I did.

  • #84708
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    Anonymous
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    The reason I did not think it was on of his best articles is that Mark continues not to factor in the exchange rate. I bought my property around 18 months ago and sure it has fallen around 8% according to recent sales, but I bought euros at 1.50 then so my property would cost me in real terms a lot more today, and I am sure that a lot of other people are in the same position. As for the future who knows where the £/Euro will be, up or down? I for one have no regrets (at the moment) about buying when I did.

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