Expat homelessness on the rise in Spain

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This topic contains 10 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Anonymous Anonymous 4 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #56965
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
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    Growing number of expats ending up on Spain’s streets as a result of the financial crisis.

    Homelessness is becoming an increasing problem among the expatriate community in Spain, as the effects of the country’s financial crisis take their toll.

    A growing number are finding themselves living on the streets after losing their jobs and subsequently failing to keep up with rent and mortgage payments.

    An average of 159 people are being evicted every day in Spain, with 82 per cent of these either living with children or classified as vulnerable.

    Expat homelessness on the rise in Spain

  • #111317
    Profile photo of logan
    logan
    Participant

    Cobblers, you can rent a reasonable apartment now on the coast for around €250 a month. Cheaper than camping. No need whatever to be homeless.

  • #111319
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
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    @logan wrote:

    Cobblers, you can rent a reasonable apartment now on the coast for around €250 a month. Cheaper than camping. No need whatever to be homeless.

    Unless of course you don’t have a job are not entitled to benifits and have no savings

  • #111320
    Profile photo of logan
    logan
    Participant

    In that event for an ex-pat, staying on in Spain would be pointless. Most other EU states offer a full range of benefit help for those without resource or assets.
    The claim ex-pats are homeless in Spain is bunk.

  • #111321
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
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    I don’t usually listen to anything jake says but when in calpe i did hear of brits that were using the soup kitchen wheather they were homeless or just couldn’t afford to eat i don’t know.What i do know is if it was me i would dust off my thumb and hitch back to the U.K for a nice little flat and all the perks untill i was sorted with a job and able to support myself again

  • #111323
    Profile photo of peterhun
    peterhun
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    @dartboy wrote:

    What i do know is if it was me i would dust off my thumb and hitch back to the U.K for a nice little flat and all the perks untill i was sorted with a job and able to support myself again

    Thats a fantasy, where do you think a council would get an empty flat from?

  • #111324
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
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    @peterhun wrote:

    @dartboy wrote:
    What i do know is if it was me i would dust off my thumb and hitch back to the U.K for a nice little flat and all the perks untill i was sorted with a job and able to support myself again

    Thats a fantasy, where do you think a council would get an empty flat from?

    Doesn’t have to be a council flat you can rent a private flat which they will pay for one of my tenants recently lost his job and the council paid the rent in full.

  • #111332
    Profile photo of GarySFBCN
    GarySFBCN
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    Normally, if these were actual Spaniards who were homeless, this situation could motivate civil unrest. Here in the US, the number of homeless is about 3.5 million. The number of empty properties, now owned by the bank is about 18 million. This fact alone shows how far astray we have gone in our values and our lack of creativity in solving problems.

    Economic systems, economic dogma that do not allow for well documented and understood centuries-old human behavior will fail.

    Profiting from misery is not a sound business model.

  • #111347
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
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    Will there be civil unrest in Spain soon? There are lots about British people with illegal houses, which is terrible, and nothing much seems to be being done but there are lots and lots of Spanish people having their homes repossessed and if they are declared bankrupt that means for life, not like so many Brits seem to be doing on other forums by asking if they declare themselves bankrupt and hand the spanish property keys back then they’ll walk away free within a few years. Spanish people, many of them youngsters with families, are losing everything and they’ll never be able to get back on track as they’ll be bankrupt for life. When will the Gov. in Spain change that law?? Why is it not the same amount of time for bankrupty in the whole of the EU? Because everyone always protects the banks, even if they are corrupt and mainly to blame for most of the ‘pain in Spain’.

  • #111348
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
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    @garysfbcn. “profiting from misery is not a sound business model.”

    I’snt what capitilsm all about ????

  • #111349
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
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    @itsme ” When will the Gov. in Spain change that law?? Why is it not the same amount of time for bankrupty in the whole of the EU? “

    Even if they change. They cannot change the banks lending policy. Once you have been bankrupted the stigma lives. The Banks will always ask you the question and accordinhly either not lend you or charge you extra interest rates. This brings me nicely to my above postion @garysfbcn which stresses the point of profiting misery.

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