Europe’s biggest shopping centre opens in Zaragoza

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Anonymous Anonymous 4 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #57092
    Profile photo of DBMarcos99
    DBMarcos99
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    British Land and Orion Capital Managers open Spain’s largest fashion mall at Puerto Venecia

    http://www.britishland.com/index.asp?pageid=42&newsid=397

    Stephen Smith, Chief Investment Officer for British Land, said: “Puerto Venecia will be one of Spain’s most spectacular retail destinations and will dominate its significant catchment. We are delighted that the retail and leisure offer will feature the very best national and international brands.”

    Aref Lahham, Director of Orion Capital Managers, said: “Our decision to invest in Puerto Venecia has been fully endorsed by the line-up of well-known retail names that have taken space in the centre. We believe that there is a continuing consolidation in the Spanish retail market with the strongest retail centres and catchment areas benefiting the most – Puerto Venecia firmly falls into this category.”

    http://www.myretailmedia.com/blog/7598/british_land_and_orion_capital_open_spain_s_largest_fashion_mall.php

  • #112560
    Profile photo of Chopera
    Chopera
    Participant

    Madrid has at least 3 shopping centres that claim to be Europe’s largest. Usually the main investors are the same large retail chains, so you end up with the same old shops and restaurants (VIPs, etc)

  • #112561
    Profile photo of DBMarcos99
    DBMarcos99
    Participant

    They keep building these shopping centres though, don’t they? If you travel around Alcobendas it seems there is a (smallish) shopping centre around every roundabout. And it seems the rage in London too. In recent years we’ve had big complexes at BlueWater, Brent Cross, Westfield White City and (opened this last year) Stratford Westfield.
    I have to admit I’d sometimes pop into the El Pilar centre on a cold Saturday when I lived close by in Madrid – take in the atmosphere, have a coffee or beer etc. It’s only now I’ve looked that I realise the name of the centre was La Vaguada. As mentioned by Chopera, a lot of the eating places are run by the big chains.
    http://www.enlavaguada.com/W/do/centre/categorie-restaurantes
    I did a small contract for a public organisation in East London last Autumn, and nearly everyone was excited at the prospect of the new Westfield opening at Stratford. I think shopping in traditional high streets is dying out to some extent due to internet shopping, but a day out in the shopping mall/centre seems to appeal to a lot of people.

    EDIT – I really only became aware of this video in the last few seconds, via Twitter. It shows a google (well it seems like a Google organised) survey being carried out in… La Vaguada. Interesting, as it shows there are plenty of of by-passers strolling through the shopping centre in the background
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPKdNUUMaKw&feature=youtu.be

  • #112562
    Profile photo of Chopera
    Chopera
    Participant

    La Vaguada was the first big centro comercial to open in Madrid – back in the 80s I guess. I’ve only been there a couple of times since I live the other side of town, but as it happens I did come across an old privately run restaurant there which did a good old fashioned and home cooked menu del día. I remember it well because it was so unusual to see that type of restaurant in a Madrid shopping centre – like some forgotten relic from the past.

    I have to admit that with kids the shopping centres are a bit of a godsend, especially in winter, since they usually have some entertainment laid on, and if you need to buy something in particular you can find it pretty easily, without having to drag the whole family around town. One of the best things about Madrid is the amount of tiny independent shops and businesses you still see tucked away. Walk down any street and you’ll often see cobblers, tailors, seamstresses, shoe shops, specialist shops dedicated to things such as freshly ground coffee, salt cod, potato crisps, serano ham, and of course all the Chinese shops selling anything you can think of. The “clone town” syndome is yet to arrive, and the franchises haven’t yet taken over. However I’m not sure how long this will last for.

  • #112563
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    You forgot about lakeside in essex which was there before bluewater,but nowdays they cater for different types lakeside for you essex wideboys and chavs,whilst bluewater is more high end aimed at your wannabees and poser’s

  • #112564
    Profile photo of DBMarcos99
    DBMarcos99
    Participant

    @dartboy wrote:

    You forgot about lakeside in essex which was there before bluewater,but nowdays they cater for different types lakeside for you essex wideboys and chavs,whilst bluewater is more high end aimed at your wannabees and poser’s

    Fair comment, but I wasn’t trying to make a comprehensive list. Canary Wharf also has a shopping centre, and quite a few rail stations have had shopping centres built next to them. The point is you see really run down drab high streets now full of betting shops and fried chicken outlets, as a lot of the trade has gravitated to the new shopping centres (or the internet). Progress of a sort, and I suppose it provides jobs within the shopping centre. Next one in London I believe will be the Elephant and Castle, which to be fair does need re-developing.

  • #112566
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I recall “La Vaguada”. There were kids hanging around to take the 100 pesetas coins from the trollys . I must say I encouraged them to see their enjoyment, enterprise & the smart thinking to supplement their pocket money.

    Most of these malls are a convenient way to launder money. The products and the price for which they were selling rubbish could not justify the Traspaso, rent, service charges, salary & the social security cost.

  • #112567
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I recall “La Vaguada”. There were kids hanging around to take the 100 pesetas coins from the trollys . I must say I encouraged them to see their enjoyment, enterprise & the smart thinking to supplement their pocket money.

    Most of these malls are a convenient way to launder money. The products and the price for which they were selling rubbish could not justify the Traspaso, rent, service charges, salary & the social security cost.

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