Coastline demolisions coming soon….?

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Anonymous Anonymous 9 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #53434
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    El País newspaper report: The government plans to free 776 km of the Mediterranean coastline from buildings.

    The plan is to reinforce the coastal law introduced in 1988 and will cost up to 5 billion €

    Will be interesting to see what really does happen

  • #75908
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    A short report on this (in English) is on today’s Typically Spanish website:
    http://www.typicallyspanish.com/news/publish/article_13298.shtml

  • #75914
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator

    This usually crops up at least once a year 😆

    The junta have actually ordered some of the beach restaurants to move some of their tables, our local one lost a full row!.

  • #75945
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    From today’s Scotsman newspaper….

    SPANISH SHOWDOWN

    TEN of thousands of British property owners face a legal showdown with the Spanish government after Madrid revealed plans to knock down all properties built illegally along the country’s coastline.

    Spain’s socialist government plans to use compensation and expropriation to clear illegal developments along 482 miles of coast – an eighth of Spain’s seaboard.

    The scheme is aimed at preventing the destruction of some of Europe’s most popular beaches, which are a vital source of tourist income, the ministry said.

    The Spanish land registry shows that about 600,000 properties in Spain are owned by Britons, but estimates at numbers built illegally vary widely.

    The government will present the plan to regional authorities today and promote it as a means to attract wealthy tourists who seek natural beauty rather than concrete resorts, according to newspaper reports.

    Desmond Sparkes, of Marbella-based Sparkes Spanish Lawyers, said: “For those who do own truly illegal properties, those built after 1988, they can’t really sue the government which made the law.

    “One remaining option is to sue the lawyer who advised them in the first place.”

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