Buying in Murcia region

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This topic contains 26 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Anonymous Anonymous 3 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #57260
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I am interested in buying a property for retirement in Murcia region Spain, and personally think now would be a good time to buy, I have registered with several agents for information and have been sent Information about Bank repossessed properties in United Golf Resort La Tercia
    The prices seem really low at 33,600 for a 1 bed, 1 bathroom and 38,600 for a 2 bed, 2 bathroom property, does anybody know anything about this place or if it is worth buying…..the prices seem really good to me but is there a catch?
    Many Thanks

    Property Status: FOR SALE

    Price: €38,600

    Extra features:

    2 BEDS 2 BATHS BANK VARIOUS
    SOUTH PHASE RM20 REF UG600 70% MORTG

    Description:
    These Bank-owned properties have just been released and have had a huge amount of interest and many reservations already.
    United Golf Resort is situated just next to the Spanish town of La Tercia on the Costa Calida coastline in the region of Murcia. The airport of Murcia San Javier is situated just 15-20 minutes away and the new airport of Murcia International is 15 minutes away (due to open April 2013).The beaches of the Mar Menor are 15 minutes away.
    The resort has been operating for many years. The apartments just released are completely finished and key ready. These have been repossessed from the original builder. All the apartments are South Facing and look out over 2 swimming pools and the Golf Course. The United Golf Resort boasts:
    Fully gated resort with security services
    9 hole Golf Course (fully operating)
    Various communal swimming pools including two full size and two childrens pools just in front of the apartments on sale
    Tennis Court
    Full size Bowls Green
    Fully equipped Gymnasium (free for owners)
    Five-a-side Football and Basketball multi-purpose pitch
    Golf Club House
    Pro Golf Shop
    Beach within 15 minutes
    15 minutes from Murcia San Javier Airport and 15 minutes from the new Murcia International Airport (given the go-ahead to open this April)
    Just 30 minutes from the proposed Paramount Theme Park due to open in the Spring of 2015 (direct rival to Euro disney).
    The High-Spec apartments boast 2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms (some ground floors have one large bathroom), marble flooring throughout, fully integrated AC/Heating system (ducting system), some designs come with white goods included, Satellite TV ready (requires contract), Broadband-ready, integrated vacuum system, and South Facing terraces. All look out towards the 9 hole Golf Course. THE MINIMUM DISCOUNT IS 87,080e!!
    All apartments have lifts and off-street parking. There is also security onsite.

    This is an amazing price for a 2 Bed 2 Bath Apartment of this standard in the South of Spain this close to airports and the beach and we have already sold many properties since the launch!

    You can download the e-brochure below.

    Please contact us for more information there are a LIMITED AMOUNT OF PROPERTIES AVAILABLE!

    To be sure not to miss out on this huge investment/lifestyle oppurtunity contact us now!

    eBrochure: Download eBrochure Here

  • #115033
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator

    Nice advert 🙄

  • #115034
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Probably differs a lot but lots of people have exteme problems in that resort. They even have a hidden forum on there only for members and I guess thats where you get to hear about some honest stories about living there.

    http://www.murcia-golf.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,42.60.html

  • #115036
    Profile photo of logan
    logan
    Participant

    Assuming on the face of it ‘knight’ is a genuine poster on here.

    I happen to know this so called ‘resort’ quite well. It’s cheap for a very good reason. If you go there you will see apartment buildings in a semi-state of collapse due to poor construction and subsidence.
    They have serious debt problems with over half of the properties unsold and the ones that are about 25% of owners don’t pay their community charges. So much needed repairs are not carried out. Crime is also an issue since as a gated community they were forced to get rid of their security guards. Much of the surrounding countryside is derelict with half build bankrupt developments.

    It’s in the middle of the boom docks and all the services and shops have left long ago. I am also told there are many legal issues still unresolved concerning the building of the place.

    All that said on the positive side it does have quite a good nine hole golf course and club house. 🙂 My best advice don’t touch it with a barge pole.

  • #115038
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    During more prosperous times, golf resorts sprung up all over Spain. The first ones offered fine golf courses and luxury houses for the residents and visitors, mostly in Andalucia and Valencia, barely affordable by the masses.

    Then the cowboys moved in to build much cheaper places for the masses, and discovered Murcia, the smallest and cheapest province in Spain. What they built has to be seen to be believed, and I’ve been down to see it.

    The whole lot was built on sand, and is now collapsing into it. Within a few years the desert will reclaim its land, and the dangerous digging in an earthquake zone may also take its toll.

    When you buy a property in a place that is collapsing all around you, cheapness is not an issue, it can never be cheap enough.

  • #115039
    Profile photo of angie
    angie
    Spectator

    Just as I thought I’d buy 10 of these bargains, nearly fell for it, nah not really 🙄

    Night Knight ❗

  • #115041
    Profile photo of logan
    logan
    Participant

    The province of Murcia is blighted by these golf developments. On my last visit I counted about 16 of them all in a relatively small area of agricultural land. I can only speculate how they all were allowed planning consent. I mean how many golfers are there who want to play in Murcia?

    They were financed mainly by the now defunct cajas. Millions of Euros were poured into these developments on the expectation of a never ending supply of gullible foreign buyers willing to pay over the odds to live on a golf course literally miles and miles from anywhere. They even built a new airport at Corvera which they did not need, is still not open and unlikely to for years. Almost all of the developers are now bankrupt.

    Murcia is still a backward region with a very harsh desert climate. Excruciatingly hot in summer and cold in winter with horrendous sirocco winds that blow incessantly from the north. Really great for golf.

    I studied the region with an eye to investment and arrived at the conclusion that it had no future at all. Most of the half built developments need to be bulldozed and returned to growing tomatoes.

  • #115043
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator

    You are all wrong…it’s only 30 mins from the new Paramount theme park 😆 😆 😆 😆

  • #115044
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    ‘Gullible foreign buyers willing to pay over the odds’, I suppose it applies the world over, but especially so in Spain which is the country we are discussing.

    The Spanish developers I know personally, and I didn’t get to know them through any business dealings with them, a couple of them were former neighbours, are still recovering from the shell shock that gullible foreigners have stopped buying their over-priced properties. They’ve had to hand the BMWs back and no longer walk about in Armani suits that never suited them anyway.

    Taking it further, Spain, the country, is adjusting to the latest truth, and just one word describes it best of all, austerity. Their media and the internet informs them that they’re not alone in their suffering, and they are adjusting, slowly.

    I’ve got Spanish builders in my house at this very moment, their banging away is disturbing me, but what I’m paying for their work is a lot less than I would have had to pay six years ago, a lot less. And they’re not as frantically busy as before, the quality of their work is improving as well. At least, I’ve got my fingers crossed.

    Later, we’re going to do most of our weekly shop. The prices are down and the service is much better than before; Carrefour is practically giving Teachers whisky away.

    If you’re not looking to buy (a house) in Spain at this time, it’s a great place to live.

  • #115046
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @logan wrote:

    They were financed mainly by the now defunct cajas.

    The ‘lovely’ CajaMurcia is now Banco Mare Nostrum…. dumped with them is also CajaGranada

  • #115047
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    ps, i’d also heard that Murcia was actually quite a wealthy area, lots of industry and being smaller than other regions it actually wasn’t in so much debt??

    Agree about a lot of golf courses needing to be turned back into agricultural land. One golf course uses the same amount of water as a whole town does each year!!

    There are a few golf resorts i’ve seen which were turning into ghost towns of badly built shells.

    The only one which still looks good that I know is Desert Springs

  • #115048
    Profile photo of logan
    logan
    Participant

    Isme – Murcia requested millions in a bailout from central government last summer just to keep it going this year. The region is bankrupt along with most others and renown for being one of the poorest regions of Spain.

    I agree Desert Springs is a good example of how to get it right but that’s in the province of Almeria. It was built by British developers and perhaps that made a difference.

  • #115049
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Desert springs is better, the trouble is after playing there you start to glow in the dark.

  • #115050
    Profile photo of DBMarcos99
    DBMarcos99
    Participant

    Murcia always had a reputation of being a very poor area many years ago (along with parts of Extremadura). People from the rest of Spain used to make assumptions about a Murcian girl if they met one.. Talking about the 80s and further back.

  • #115052
    Profile photo of logan
    logan
    Participant

    @Rocker wrote:

    Desert springs is better, the trouble is after playing there you start to glow in the dark.

    😆 😆 Very funny Rocker.

    Murcia also has one of the highest unemployment rates at 25.9%.

  • #115054
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    The Gov. pay for various Palomares residents to have tests in Madrid every year and they’ve found that they are all fine…. but I guess they have to be careful. If you ask those who saw the plane come down it wasn’t that side where Desert Springs is… but the joke is good and said by many locals who live there as well 😉

    I thought that Murcia was ‘ok’ because it was much smaller and there are various meat and veg factories there? Or is it the typical case of the very wealthy Spanish actually being those who ride around on old bikes wearing old clothes whilst having bank accounts which would leave you open mouthed (we are talking Spain here, not TOWIE style Essex show off ‘wealth’) ?

  • #115060
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator
  • #115065
    Profile photo of pizzacheaze
    pizzacheaze
    Participant

    You need to go for a holiday there at least. When we went in 2011 we decided the area wasn’t for us. We stayed at probably the best resort in the area, polaris world mar menor. The property was lovely for holidays but when you went out of the gated community into the local towns it was pretty grim.

  • #115071
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @katy wrote:

    Andalucía unemployment is over 36%, around 40% in Cádiz province

    And about the same proportion of people work in the black economy, which partly explains why there hasn’t been a revolt.

  • #115074
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator

    @mark wrote:

    @katy wrote:
    Andalucía unemployment is over 36%, around 40% in Cádiz province

    And about the same proportion of people work in the black economy, which partly explains why there hasn’t been a revolt.

    According to the apologists, like they all gave up their jobs in the public sector etc to work on the black 🙄 What would all the people who have lost their jobs actually do in Cádiz it has always been a poverty place even in the boom. You have to have people spending to support a black economy.

  • #115075
    Profile photo of logan
    logan
    Participant

    In Murcia and Almeria the black economy is thriving with armies of field workers toiling, planting and harvesting vegetables. Most of them probably illegals. I’m told they sleep at night in the plastic poly tunnels. 🙁

  • #115076
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator

    @logan wrote:

    In Murcia and Almeria the black economy is thriving with armies of field workers toiling, planting and harvesting vegetables. Most of them probably illegals. I’m told they sleep at night in the plastic poly tunnels. 🙁

    Many working for 4€ per hour 🙁 and it’s seasonal!

  • #115079
    Profile photo of DBMarcos99
    DBMarcos99
    Participant

    It’ll be interesting to see if the 50 Euro autonomo fee for young people will affect this working on the black.

    Moving article here on how educated Spaniards are trying to get around the crisis by changing the focus of their work, and by moving back to the family home to save money, but the high costs of starting a business do not help.

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/well-educated-young-spaniards-move-back-in-with-parents-a-881525.html

    García and Vivar each pay €500 ($675) per month for office rent and social security contributions. They take part in contests for public buildings, as well as Europe-wide bids. But rarely is the prize money enough to cover the cost of drawings and models. They would not survive without the support of their parents.

  • #115082
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant
    DBMarcos99 wrote:
    It’ll be interesting to see if the 50 Euro autonomo fee for young people will affect this working on the black.

    Moving article here on how educated Spaniards are trying to get around the crisis by changing the focus of their work, and by moving back to the family home to save money, but the high costs of starting a business do not help.

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/well-educated-young-spaniards-move-back-in-with-parents-a-881525.html

    Quote:
    García and Vivar each pay €500 ($675) per month for office rent and social security contributions. They take part in contests for public buildings, as well as Europe-wide bids. But rarely is the prize money enough to cover the cost of drawings and models. They would not survive without the support of their parents.

    What’s wrong living with their parents? In tough times it is good to find a welcoming roof.

    And I would advise them to save some money by eating/drinking less. They are quite chubby for ~30year olds.

  • #115121
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator

    @mark wrote:

    @katy wrote:
    Andalucía unemployment is over 36%, around 40% in Cádiz province

    And about the same proportion of people work in the black economy, which partly explains why there hasn’t been a revolt.

    Someone should have told this guy about the jobs in the black economy before he threw himself out of the 4th floor!

    http://www.diariosur.es/rc/20130208/sociedad/hombre-suicida-cordoba-tras-201302081451.html

  • #115124
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @dbmarcos99 wrote:

    It’ll be interesting to see if the 50 Euro autonomo fee for young people will affect this working on the black.

    Moving article here on how educated Spaniards are trying to get around the crisis by changing the focus of their work, and by moving back to the family home to save money, but the high costs of starting a business do not help.

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/well-educated-young-spaniards-move-back-in-with-parents-a-881525.html

    García and Vivar each pay €500 ($675) per month for office rent and social security contributions. They take part in contests for public buildings, as well as Europe-wide bids. But rarely is the prize money enough to cover the cost of drawings and models. They would not survive without the support of their parents.

    What a sad and moving article, thanks for that. I remember politicians going on about education, education, education and agreed with the mantra at the time, and may still do.

    But if we educate all our young people to degree level, who’s going to drive the buses and build the houses?

    Having said that, we’ve got Spanish builders in at the moment and they’re noisy, not just with their banging about, but also with their incessant talking at shouting level. I overheard one of the younger ones today talking about his degree from a northern uni. He was mixing cement at the time.

    But I know they’re well paid, because I’m paying them.

  • #115161
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    oh god how sad, how very, very sad that a little girl has lost her father due to the stress of a blooming mortgage. How sad for their whole family. These are the cases where they more than likely just wanted to buy a ‘home’ for the family to live in. They weren’t investors or con merchants out to harm anyone, just a family who wanted their own home and then when they had no job had to decide to buy food or pay the mortgage. It’s hard reading it.

    http://www.diariosur.es/rc/20130208/sociedad/hombre-suicida-cordoba-tras-201302081451.html%5B/quote%5D

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