Bulgarians and Romanians will steal Spanish jobs

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This topic contains 10 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Anonymous Anonymous 3 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #57321
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Spain will be flooded with an influx of people from Romania and Bulgaria when these countries join the EU later this year and many will break into the holiday homes of the British and squat there and they will undercut and steal the jobs of the local Spanish population forcing wages even lower and resulting in an even lower standard of living for ordinary Spanish people.

    Spain is going down the toilet. Don’t buy a property in Spain.

  • #115966
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Um, I think that they’ve been doing that for years already haven’t they?

  • #115967
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator

    Item in Sur today. Home robbed in Estepona. Theives caught 1 Spaniard, 1 Bulgarian and 2 Romanians. Had lotsof drugs in the car too!

  • #115971
    Profile photo of DBMarcos99
    DBMarcos99
    Participant

    @itsme wrote:

    Um, I think that they’ve been doing that for years already haven’t they?

    There have been large numbers of Rumanians and Bulgarians in Spain for at least 8 years now (although the Spanish govt tried to stop further arrivals arriving without a job last year). Some estimate there are 200,000 Rumanians in Madrid alone!
    I came across many hard-working and talented eastern Europeans when I worked in Madrid- and I know a few here in London too. It’s sad that the media will ignore a community comprising thousands that get on with their lives, and instead highlight a relatively small group of law breakers. After all, if we read that a school girl has been stabbed to death in Birmingham, we don’t assume that Brummies are knife-wielding maniacs? At least I hope we don’t.

  • #115974
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    there are 1,000,000 rumanians and 500,000 bulgarians in Spain; they mostly work in the catering and services industry and if you visit Valencia, madrid and Barcelona you’ll find they have all the jobs in the hotels and restaurants. They are also excellent workers and employers will take them on before Spaniards!!!!!!……….sad but true …….. 😥 😥 😥 😥

  • #115976
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    There are also a lot of ‘ladies of the night’ who come from these countries as well.

  • #115978
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    The low wages that they are paid are the same which the Spaniards would get in that particular sector of economy. I mean the black economy.

    Ladies of the nights will not operate in their pueblo or in their Countries if they have choice for obvious reasons.

  • #115980
    Profile photo of Chopera
    Chopera
    Participant

    We got some Romanians to reform our flat and our cleaning lady is Romanian. Lovely people, hard working, and completely trustworthy.

  • #115981
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Shakeel, it’s not low wages at all!!!!!; it’s the fact that they want to work and to do a good job!!! – also, forget all this business that everyone is working in black in Spain: it’s just not true. Dodgy contracts with half paid in cash?; yes; but not been exploited by employers!!

  • #115982
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @Ubeda: ” it’s not low wages at all!!!!!; it’s the fact that they want to work and to do a good job!!! “

    I dont doubt this and agree with you that they work hard, they have problem solving attitude and are pleasant.

    That is an spirit of any immigrant & for this reason immigrants are a constructive part of the economy. If the locals dont like they need to up their game & compete.

  • #115983
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Video: Spain jobs crisis gives rise to entrepreneurs

    Spain’s unemployment rate currently stands at more than 26 per cent, and as such a growing number of people are turning to self-employment to earn a living. From cafe owners to clothing companies, many Spaniards are finding it a viable alternative to being jobless, although few manage to remain operational for more than three years.

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