Avoiding the land grabs?

LoadingFavourite

This topic contains 34 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Anonymous Anonymous 6 years, 9 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #55430
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    It rather seems that the crash has started. Prices appear to be falling quite rapidly here (Alicante). In fact I am off to look at a “casa de campo” tomorrow that seems like a good buy. Of course it’s on rustico land, and the thought occurs to me that it may get land grabbed in the future.

    Whilst I appreciate that it’s impossible to predict the future plans of local councils & developers. I am wondering what basic checks I can do, to see if there are any plans in place now.

    Any suggestions?

  • #96964
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    If prices are going down and there are good buys out there why risk buying a property on rustic land when there are plenty of legal ones to buy. Why take this unecessary risk. Speaking from experience and the nightmare we have had for the last 6 years (still on going). Its crazy. My opinion anyway.

  • #96766
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    If prices are going down and there are good buys out there why risk buying a property on rustic land when there are plenty of legal ones to buy. Why take this unecessary risk. Speaking from experience and the nightmare we have had for the last 6 years (still on going). Its crazy. My opinion anyway.

  • #96770
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Anciano,

    What do you call a good buy in the campo? Just curious what you have seen.

    Mark

  • #96966
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Anciano,

    What do you call a good buy in the campo? Just curious what you have seen.

    Mark

  • #96774
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @axwhale wrote:

    If prices are going down and there are good buys out there why risk buying a property on rustic land when there are plenty of legal ones to buy. Why take this unecessary risk. Speaking from experience and the nightmare we have had for the last 6 years (still on going). Its crazy. My opinion anyway.

    Mainly because urban plots tend to be small, and I prefer to live in less developed areas.

  • #96968
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @axwhale wrote:

    If prices are going down and there are good buys out there why risk buying a property on rustic land when there are plenty of legal ones to buy. Why take this unecessary risk. Speaking from experience and the nightmare we have had for the last 6 years (still on going). Its crazy. My opinion anyway.

    Mainly because urban plots tend to be small, and I prefer to live in less developed areas.

  • #96776
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @mark wrote:

    Anciano,

    What do you call a good buy in the campo? Just curious what you have seen.

    Mark

    3000 metres plot, 130m house (a bit small, but we can add another level if/when we need it). no mains electricity, 15 mins from airport. 105000€ asking price

  • #96969
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @mark wrote:

    Anciano,

    What do you call a good buy in the campo? Just curious what you have seen.

    Mark

    3000 metres plot, 130m house (a bit small, but we can add another level if/when we need it). no mains electricity, 15 mins from airport. 105000€ asking price

  • #96782
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I think there is insurance against these threats… which are, at least in this climate, receding? Ask Lloyds?

  • #96972
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I think there is insurance against these threats… which are, at least in this climate, receding? Ask Lloyds?

  • #96821
    Profile photo of petej
    petej
    Participant

    I would agree with Axwale, IMO there are plenty of pitfalls when buying property in Spain, is it really worth adding another with buying on Rustico land especially in the Comunidad Valenciana Area ❓

  • #96991
    Profile photo of petej
    petej
    Participant

    I would agree with Axwale, IMO there are plenty of pitfalls when buying property in Spain, is it really worth adding another with buying on Rustico land especially in the Comunidad Valenciana Area ❓

  • #96823
    Profile photo of Inez
    Inez
    Participant

    If you do find an insurance against land grab tread carefully and check the small print. Ive just got hold of a company who protect title deeds against irregularities for 20 years but they wont pay out against landgrab!

  • #96992
    Profile photo of Inez
    Inez
    Participant

    If you do find an insurance against land grab tread carefully and check the small print. Ive just got hold of a company who protect title deeds against irregularities for 20 years but they wont pay out against landgrab!

  • #96825
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @petej wrote:

    I would agree with Axwale, IMO there are plenty of pitfalls when buying property in Spain, is it really worth adding another with buying on Rustico land especially in the Comunidad Valenciana Area ❓

    Well, I guess that depends on what you are looking for. We live here, and for our needs rustico properties are a good match. We very rarely see houses that are suitable for us and urbano. And so far all we have seen have been crazy money.

    I feel that the LRAU (or whatever it’s called these days) is a real risk but probably a small one. Living in an unsuitable home isn’t too good either. So, for us it’s probably still a valid choice. If we are fortunate the silly over-development of recent years will not be such an issue in future years.

    Also, it’s easy to forget that we had (have?) land grab laws in the UK, isn’t it called “compulsory purchase”? So, Valencia is not alone in this. Of course it has been dramatically over-used here. But these risks exist in other places too.

  • #96993
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @petej wrote:

    I would agree with Axwale, IMO there are plenty of pitfalls when buying property in Spain, is it really worth adding another with buying on Rustico land especially in the Comunidad Valenciana Area ❓

    Well, I guess that depends on what you are looking for. We live here, and for our needs rustico properties are a good match. We very rarely see houses that are suitable for us and urbano. And so far all we have seen have been crazy money.

    I feel that the LRAU (or whatever it’s called these days) is a real risk but probably a small one. Living in an unsuitable home isn’t too good either. So, for us it’s probably still a valid choice. If we are fortunate the silly over-development of recent years will not be such an issue in future years.

    Also, it’s easy to forget that we had (have?) land grab laws in the UK, isn’t it called “compulsory purchase”? So, Valencia is not alone in this. Of course it has been dramatically over-used here. But these risks exist in other places too.

  • #96829
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator

    Sounds a small plot for rural, many villas in Marbella have 2000M2. It also seems expensive for a place without electric.

    Yes, there is compulsary purchase in the UK…they pay you. In Valencia they take some of your land and you pay them to put in the infrastructure.

  • #96995
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator

    Sounds a small plot for rural, many villas in Marbella have 2000M2. It also seems expensive for a place without electric.

    Yes, there is compulsary purchase in the UK…they pay you. In Valencia they take some of your land and you pay them to put in the infrastructure.

  • #96831
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator

    @inez wrote:

    If you do find an insurance against land grab tread carefully and check the small print. Ive just got hold of a company who protect title deeds against irregularities for 20 years but they wont pay out against landgrab!

    Not just the small print, check out the Company who is offering the insurance! Some who have been selling these have already disappeared 🙄

  • #96996
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator

    @inez wrote:

    If you do find an insurance against land grab tread carefully and check the small print. Ive just got hold of a company who protect title deeds against irregularities for 20 years but they wont pay out against landgrab!

    Not just the small print, check out the Company who is offering the insurance! Some who have been selling these have already disappeared 🙄

  • #96833
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    El anciano

    ‘compulsory purchase’ in the UK is nothing like the Spanish land grab ‘robbery by crooks’ who have little to fear from the hopeless justice system. Your lawyer in the UK is fully expected to obtain a reasonable market price for the purchase. Of course this won’t suit everyone for a variety of reasons, but at least it goes some way to a fair conclusion from a financial point of view.

  • #96997
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    El anciano

    ‘compulsory purchase’ in the UK is nothing like the Spanish land grab ‘robbery by crooks’ who have little to fear from the hopeless justice system. Your lawyer in the UK is fully expected to obtain a reasonable market price for the purchase. Of course this won’t suit everyone for a variety of reasons, but at least it goes some way to a fair conclusion from a financial point of view.

  • #96835
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Oh well, never mind 🙂

  • #96998
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Oh well, never mind 🙂

  • #96839
    Profile photo of petej
    petej
    Participant

    @El anciano wrote:

    I feel that the LRAU (or whatever it’s called these days) is a real risk but probably a small one. Living in an unsuitable home isn’t too good either. So, for us it’s probably still a valid choice. If we are fortunate the silly over-development of recent years will not be such an issue in future years.

    Yes I think I would say there is less risk these days with (we hope) less appetite/money to build

    @El anciano wrote:

    Also, it’s easy to forget that we had (have?) land grab laws in the UK, isn’t it called “compulsory purchase”? So, Valencia is not alone in this. Of course it has been dramatically over-used here. But these risks exist in other places too.

    As far as I know ( and I could be totally wrong here ) when land Is taken in a LRAU case you only get a percentage of the value of the land/house and are then charged fees to help with the works taking place on the land, in the UK you are given market value for your land/property and of course you don’t pay towards works taking place on the land, this happen to a friend of mine when he lost his house to the M25 some years ago and he was very happy with the price he got, true market value

  • #97000
    Profile photo of petej
    petej
    Participant

    @El anciano wrote:

    I feel that the LRAU (or whatever it’s called these days) is a real risk but probably a small one. Living in an unsuitable home isn’t too good either. So, for us it’s probably still a valid choice. If we are fortunate the silly over-development of recent years will not be such an issue in future years.

    Yes I think I would say there is less risk these days with (we hope) less appetite/money to build

    @El anciano wrote:

    Also, it’s easy to forget that we had (have?) land grab laws in the UK, isn’t it called “compulsory purchase”? So, Valencia is not alone in this. Of course it has been dramatically over-used here. But these risks exist in other places too.

    As far as I know ( and I could be totally wrong here ) when land Is taken in a LRAU case you only get a percentage of the value of the land/house and are then charged fees to help with the works taking place on the land, in the UK you are given market value for your land/property and of course you don’t pay towards works taking place on the land, this happen to a friend of mine when he lost his house to the M25 some years ago and he was very happy with the price he got, true market value

  • #96841
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator

    As someone who has lived in a rural area having a lot of land can be a burden. Many are plagued by hunters shooting around it, the nearest shack may be miles away but noise carries more in the campo (especially barking dogs!).

    If I were looking to buy I would look at something on the fringes of a town/village, established, with all utilities in place.

  • #97001
    Profile photo of katy
    katy
    Spectator

    As someone who has lived in a rural area having a lot of land can be a burden. Many are plagued by hunters shooting around it, the nearest shack may be miles away but noise carries more in the campo (especially barking dogs!).

    If I were looking to buy I would look at something on the fringes of a town/village, established, with all utilities in place.

  • #96845
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Is it a house on the nota simple, or a nave ?

  • #97003
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Is it a house on the nota simple, or a nave ?

  • #96851
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    petej wrote

    ”As far as I know ( and I could be totally wrong here ) when land Is taken in a LRAU case you only get a percentage of the value of the land/house and are then charged fees to help with the works taking place on the land, in the UK you are given market value for your land/property and of course you don’t pay towards works taking place on the land, this happen to a friend of mine when he lost his house to the M25 some years ago and he was very happy with the price he got, true market value”

    I think you are about right, and what a good example of how once again the law of common sense in the UK verses the daylight robbery laws in Spain!. Can’t be clearer can it? This should be added to the government health warning attached to any info’ about buying in Spain!!

  • #97006
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    petej wrote

    ”As far as I know ( and I could be totally wrong here ) when land Is taken in a LRAU case you only get a percentage of the value of the land/house and are then charged fees to help with the works taking place on the land, in the UK you are given market value for your land/property and of course you don’t pay towards works taking place on the land, this happen to a friend of mine when he lost his house to the M25 some years ago and he was very happy with the price he got, true market value”

    I think you are about right, and what a good example of how once again the law of common sense in the UK verses the daylight robbery laws in Spain!. Can’t be clearer can it? This should be added to the government health warning attached to any info’ about buying in Spain!!

  • #96853
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @goodstich44 wrote:

    I think you are about right, and what a good example of how once again the law of common sense in the UK verses the daylight robbery laws in Spain!. Can’t be clearer can it?

    Except that this isn’t an example of anything. Just opinion, and not at all clear.

    This ranting about Spain is IMHO quite unnecessary, most of us have been here long enough to have some understanding of the issues, and when all is said and done, I’d still choose Spain over the UK as a place to live. Sure there are problems/risks, but the UK is hardly an idyllic paradise.

    If you have been hurt by the issues in Spain, then I am sorry for you, and I know that plenty have had problems. But when all is said and done, there are still a good number here who like living here, and not everyone gets conned.

  • #97007
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    @goodstich44 wrote:

    I think you are about right, and what a good example of how once again the law of common sense in the UK verses the daylight robbery laws in Spain!. Can’t be clearer can it?

    Except that this isn’t an example of anything. Just opinion, and not at all clear.

    This ranting about Spain is IMHO quite unnecessary, most of us have been here long enough to have some understanding of the issues, and when all is said and done, I’d still choose Spain over the UK as a place to live. Sure there are problems/risks, but the UK is hardly an idyllic paradise.

    If you have been hurt by the issues in Spain, then I am sorry for you, and I know that plenty have had problems. But when all is said and done, there are still a good number here who like living here, and not everyone gets conned.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.