Advantages / disadvantages of a residence visa

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Anonymous Anonymous 9 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #52651
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    For NON-EU citizens, what are the advantages and disadvantages of getting a residence visa in Spain? Is it mainly a tax issue and if so, how complicated is it to have to file with 2 countries (Spain and US) if one has no income other than investment and pension (SS) income?

  • #69406
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    I cannot speak for the Tax position in USA. Its todays world there is a double taxation treaty with most advence economies. A few hints I can give you about Spain

    1) First issue is that most regions have their own Tax variations.

    2) As a Spanish resident you will be Taxed on your world Income. In Spain you have to pay wealth Tax. Its a small amount, its annoying and is silly. So if you have a Goya or Dali in your house you pay welath Tax. How you pay and is not the Tax mans problem The problem is that if you have wealth and no cash flow, you cant part sellthe Goya or Dali.

    3) Spanish Banks dont like to lend money and the cost of obtaining a credit is high and thus its not econimical.

    4) If you are a resident and you sell your house and buy another one
    in two years you dont pay capital gains Tax.

    5) Health Insurance is expensive and post hospital care non exisatent.

    6) The Courts do not work. ( Sp dont legal trigger happy)

    7) Consumer rights are in its infancy.

    8) Nobody in any walk of life will take any responsibilty. If things happen they happen.

    9) The govt/private enterprises do not beleive in training. So dont get shocked by the so called professional.

    10) Red traffic lights means you can go, amber means you can go. Greem means you can go but maybe not.

    I am not trying to discrouge. Som,e of these things you may have got use to Turkey. But rthan Turkey not a member of EU

  • #69508
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Most of what you describe was true throughout the 15 years that I lived in Italy and is true of Turkey today. I have lived in many 3rd word, developing, and industrialized countries so don’t have great expectations re Spain, especially given that we were already cheated royally and illegally by Iberia Airlines and got nowhere protesting to them, to the National Consumer Agency in Spain and even to a European oversight agency.

    What we’re trying to do is collect info to make the best decision as to whether or not to apply for a residence permit. The only reason we would do this would be to import our used furniture now in storage since 3 years ago and costing us US 3000 / year. To this end your info is valuable and appreciated.

    I guess we have to either decide to permanently part with 16% of whatever the customs decide is the value of our mostly used furniture, or opt for the lengthy process of soliciting a residence permit.

    But how, pray tell, would Spain know what investments one has in another country?

  • #69644
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Why bother coming to live in Spain in the first place?

    Just go back to wherever it is you came from and let them get on with their third world arrangements.

    I just do not understand how you come to live in a country that is not your own, ie as a guest, and you think that you have the right to criticize it.

    Good day!

  • #69793
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    If you are a non-EU citizen then you have no option but to get a visa.

    This is not easy as there are severe restrictions – just the same as trying to get a visa to live in the USA.

    I wish you luck but you will find that the EU can be as parochial as the USA when it comes to visas.

  • #69939
    Profile photo of Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Participant

    For anyone else in this situation, the answer is this. If you want to import furniture duty-free, it is assumed you are changing residence and requires a residence permit.

    If you only have a second home which will be used less than half the year, then non-EU citizens need only a long-duration Shengen visa but will have to pay import duty even on used furniture. Approx 50% of the value.

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